Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 2nd International Conference on Food Safety and Regulatory Measures London, UK.

Day 2 :

  • Special Session on "Allergen Management and Regulatory Measures"

Session Introduction

Sylvia Pfaff

Food Information Service
Germany

Title: Regulatory measures needed on unintentional allergen cross contamination

Time : 10:00:10:25

Speaker
Biography:

Sylvia Pfaff studied Food Chemistry in Hamburg. She works as a Consultant for the food industry since 1996. Her main work experiences are food safety and quality management, allergen management, GMO issues, hygiene and packaging. She was in all research projects directly involved. She has therefore intense experience with innovation projects on national and European level; close networks to food companies, retailers and science. At FIS Europe, she works on several projects concerning integrated management systems for the food business where consumer issues are important. She organises seminars, workshops and focus groups regularly. She was involved in the EU research projects SPAS, Consumer Choice and EuroPrevall. Currently, she works with the German Patient Organisation on allergen management and allergen labelling.

Abstract:

The management of unintentional allergen presence has a lot of approaches worldwide. In some countries only the detection of undeclared allergens lead to a recall. On the other hand, some countries do not even inform allergic consumers after the detection of allergens if this is caused by cross-contamination. Both approaches cannot be right. We have to define when the allergic consumer is at risk (how much is too much), how to manage allergens in the food production (what are the best steps in an allergen management system) and how to react if unintentional allergen presence is detected (how to assess the risk, what kind of measurements are necessary, how to inform the allergic consumer). In this Breakout Session, we will highlight the issue from different angles. This speech will cover: Setting the scene – why is regulation of allergen cross contamination important? Summary of German stakeholder conference November 2015 - tolerable reactions after allergen intake, protection of allergic consumers, agreed action level for peanut and portion size and gaps in research and analysis and further steps and measurements of regulators.

Speaker
Biography:

Hazel Gowland is well-known as a food allergic champion consumer, patient representative, researcher and trainer. She has worked for and with the Anaphylaxis Campaign since 1994 and as an independent expert adviser - Allergy Action (www.allergyaction.org ) since 2000. In partnership with world-leading clinicians, food industry bodies, regulators, scientists and social scientists, consumer and patient organisations, she continues to investigate fatal and ‘near miss’ reactions, contributing to improved understanding of allergy risks and how they can be reduced and controlled, both in those people at risk and by those managing their environments and their food.

Abstract:

‘May contain’ labelling to indicate the possible presence of non ingredient allergens in foods on sale has been in place for 20 years. Studies indicate that it is both over and under-used. Decision-making about when to use it and what form it should take is still variable. Analytical tools to support its use are more widely available but depend on the competence of the laboratory to handle different food matrices as well as the method(s) available for the particular allergen. Regulatory alignment and consumer/patient trust depend on a wide range of complex co-factors. These include: The availability of relevant, accessible and practical analytical methods for food allergens in different food matrices; variability in allergic reactions as well as the amount of allergen triggering different symptom; social and political factors behind regulation - consumer expectations and stakeholder commitment and; understanding and supporting the information needs of all ‘food audiences’ – including all those who prepare food for others.

Break: Networking and Refreshments @ 10:50-11:05
Speaker
Biography:

Pauline Titchener studied Food Technology at the University of Glasgow. Following graduation, she worked at the food indusry in both quality assurance and new product development roles. For the last 10 years, she has been working for Neogen Europe, a leading manufacturer of food safety diagnostic tests. She is currently responsible for the business development of the allergen and speciation diagnostic ranges accross Europe.

Abstract:

Analytical methods are a key tool of an allergen management plan and can be used to aid manufacturers to validate and verifiy their cleaning schedules, finished product testing or their supply network. However, with such a variety of both manufacturing methods and analytical techniques, it can often be a challenge for food manufacturers to select approriate methods. A variety of analytical techniques are available for food allergen analysis, including those based on ELISA, PCR and, more recently, LCMS:MS techniques. Each of these methods have potential benefits and limitations for the detection of food allergens. Using practical examples, the factors that should be evaluated when validating methods for suitability will be considered, with a focus on ELISA and lateral flow technology. These include the format of the food allergen, effect of processing on food allergen detection and matrix interference. Significant efforts are being made by the scientific community to overcome some of the challenges of allergen analysis, which include the need for food allergen reference materials to improve existing methods and to aid validation of new methods. Looking forward, a key area for the use of appropriately validated methods is the application of these tools in relation to food allergen thresholds.

Jackie Healing

Coles Supermarkets
Australia

Title: Retailer perspective - Global supply chain best practices

Time : 11:55 - 12:20

Speaker
Biography:

Jackie Healing recently returned to the UK from her position as General Manager – Quality and Responsible Sourcing with Coles Supermarkets, Australia with over 25 years of experience in food retailing globally. She specialises in the development and implementation of retail change programs with growers and manufacturers who support the retailers’ private label offer. Her focus is on developing differentiated products which are sustainable and deliver exceptional quality and value to customers. She works collaboratively across a wide stakeholder group of government, regulators, manufacturers and consumer groups. Her recent achievements include the development of a higher platform for quality management and measurement of retail supermarket suppliers; the launch of a dedicated training academy for supermarket suppliers, leading the change programme in labour hire practice for the Agricultural industry in Australia, etc. She has firsthand experience of the application of the VITAL tool in determining relevant risk assessed allergen labelling requirements and believes this to be an approach that others should follow. During her collegiate career, she earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Food Science and Agriculture from the University of Reading UK, graduating with Honours. She moved back to England from Australia in January this year and is currently looking for her next professional opportunity.

Abstract:

Food allergies continue to be one of the greatest causes of product recall and withdrawal globally causing financial and emotional burden to retailers, manufacturers and consumers. Mislabelling is all too commonly the cause of product being removed from sale and yet we, in the industry, could be accused of making the situation worse by taking a very risk adverse approach to the subject of allergen labelling. The VITAL (Voluntary Incidental Trace Allergen Labelling) tool, developed by the Allergen Bureau, gives a standardised allergen risk assessment process for the food industry. It provides manufacturers, retailers and consumers with practical scientifically based allergen labeling guidelines taking into account the allergen thresholds. It also gives a clear recommendation for allergen labeling warnings which means a consistent approach is used on all products easing decision making both for manufacturers and customers. Customers appreciate the increased product choice they have as a result and the industry benefits from a more pragmatic approach. Overall cost savings result through the reduction in number of unnecessary product withdrawals. In this short presentation you will hear how the tool works in practice with some examples taken from Jackie’s’ experience managing food safety for retailers globally.

  • Track 5: Advances in Food Quality and Processing
    Track 7: Food Security and Food Policy
    Track 11: Foodomics Approaches in Food Safety
Speaker
Biography:

Zhiguo Li has completed his PhD at the age of 27 years from Jiangsu University and is carrying out postdoctoral studies of Marie Curie Research Fellow from School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham. His research interest focuses on the evaluation and prevention of mechanical handling damage of fruits and vegetables. He has published 30 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as six journals of editorial board member of repute.Li was always invited to be Reviewer of 16 international journals in food engineering.

Abstract:

Mechanical characterization of single cells is vital to the macro-scale modelling and simulation of mechanical damage to fruits and vegetables. The mechanical behaviour of single cells in the tomato mesocarp tissue was characterized by micro-compression testing. Single cells of Elegance tomatoes were novel isolated by mechanical brushing from a mesocarp block into water in a beaker and then transferred into a chamber for micro-compression. In order minimise the effect of viscoelasticity and possible loss of water under compression, 20 single cells were compressed to a final deformation of 15% at 4900 μm/s which was much higher than the previous loading speed. The cells were treated as a solid sphere in order to model their elastic behaviour using the Hertz model. The cell geometry was characterized by the initial height, geometric mean diameter and sphericity and the elastic-plastic mechanics of cell were characterized by peak force Fmax, elastic modulus E and yield stress σy deduced by Kogut & Etsion (2002). There was a strong correlation between the initial height and geometric mean diameter, and a significant difference in the geometric mean diameter of cells before and after compression (P<0.05). Fmax increased with the cell diameter GMD1, but E and σy were independent of the cell geometric parameters as expected. The Fmax, E and σy of single cells in the mesocarp were 2.5±0.6 mN, 0.8±0.2 MPa and 0.03±0.01 MPa respectively. These cell mechanical parameters are intended to be used to model the relationship between macro-scale and micro-scale mechanics of tomato fruits.

Stephen Holroyd

Fonterra Research and Development Centre
New Zealand

Title: Non-targeted methods for detection of food adulteration
Speaker
Biography:

Stephen Holroyd is a Research Programme Manager within Fonterra’s External Science & Technology team. His current responsibilities include leadership of research on analytical science and food processing. He has been the Chair of the International Dairy Federation (IDF) Standing Committee on Analytical Methods for Composition (SCAMC). He has 20 years of experience in the implementation of infrared analytical spectroscopy in oil and gas, pharmaceutical and food applications. He has a PhD in Chemistry from the University of Auckland (New Zealand) and Post-doctoral experience at Cambridge University (UK) and has published over 40 papers in peer-reviewed journals.

Abstract:

Food fraud costs the global industry several billion dollars every year, negatively affecting public confidence in food producers and regulators, and can result in unfortunate public health consequences. The use of non-targeted analytical methods to detect and deter adulteration in food ingredients has gained recent interest because of their potential ability to detect new unexpected adulterants that may enter supply chains. A multinational collaborative team led by a US Pharmacopeia expert panel is researching and developing a tool-box of non-targeted analytical methods and supporting reference materials for detecting adulteration in milk ingredients. This presentation will give an update on the outcomes to date of this collaborative effort, including studies conducted to evaluate and develop NIR, Raman, NMR, MALDI‒TOF‒MS, UPLC and wet-chemistry technologies. An update on the advancement of a US Pharmacopeial Convention Guidance on how to develop and validate non-targeted methods will also be provided, with a focus on clear use of terminology and a defined chain of logic for method validation. Lastly, the presentation will highlight the challenges ahead to advance the development and widespread utility of non-targeted methods.

Speaker
Biography:

Qingren Wang completed his Ph D in 1996 with a Sino-Australia joint program. He is an Extension Agent for Commercial Vegetables and Pesticide Licensing at UF/IFAS Miami-Dade Extension. He has published more than 130 papers in national and international journals

Abstract:

Food safety has become one of important priorities to consumers, producers and handlers because outbreak of a foodborne illness can cause serious health problems even death, and the producers or handlers may face bankruptcy and litigation consequences. To imprpve food safety the U.S. government has lauched a number of programs, such as Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs), Hazard Analysis of Critical Contro Points (HACCPs), and the final rule of Food Safety Modernizaiton Act (FSMA) for agricultural products including fresh vegetables as general guidelines to minimize food safety risks of microbiological, chemical and physical hazards. The implementation of these guidelines in various commodities of vegetable industry requires a development of the comprehensive extension program for specific crops during growing, harvesting, transportation, processing, packing, storage and handling of fresh vegetable products. The implementation of these programs is to focus on farm managers, on-site food safety coordinators, vegetable harvesters, shippers, packers, and processors to minimize any potential hazards associated with various aspects including land history, adjacent land use, water quality, worker hygiene, pesticide and fertilizer application, equipment sanitation, transportation, and processing procedures.

Speaker
Biography:

Alessandra Roncarati is Associate Professor of Zooculture at Camerino University. She is involved in the field of aquaculture. Her research is aimed at improving the rearing techniques of aquatic organisms in order to optimize performance in terms of the quality of the final product. She has published more than 30 papers in refered journals.

Abstract:

In recent years, the quality of fish produced by aquaculture has been largely investigated at international level. Consumers are interested to know if it is better to eat farmed fish or those coming from a fishery. In particular, the debate is aimed at understanding whether the several health benefits attributed to the consumption of wild seafood, are also obtained from farmed fish, especially with respect to the fat content and fatty acid composition. Seafood is an important source of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), which are essential in preventing disorders and cardiovascular diseases, thanks to their anti-inflammatory and vasodilatory properties. In the present paper, data on quality traits of wild and farmed fish will be discussed with particular regard to the lipid content and fatty acid profile. In species coming from a fishery, the meat lipid level and fatty acid composition are affected by several factors. The lipid content ranges from 0.5 to 20 g/100 g of fish, depending on the season, the food availability and water temperature. In this context, the high quality of fish caught in the Adriatic sea will be demonstrated. In farmed fish species, new rearing strategies are being adopted in order to produce large-size animals, as in sea bass farming weighing 800-1200 g, to diversify the final marketable size. In the evaluation of fish meat quality obtained with aquaculture practice, it will be shown that the fatty acid profile of flesh reflects mainly the fatty acid profile of the feed administered. The final nutritional flesh quality in relation to diet will be discussed, also considering the replacement of fishmeal and fish oil with innovative feedstuffs.

Speaker
Biography:

Stan Kubow is an Associate Professor at Dietetics and Human Nutrition at McGill University. He has 107 peer-reviewed research publications in clinical and human population studies, animal models and cell culture examining the impact of foods, nutrients and phytochemicals on a variety of disease outcomes. He is the Editorial Board Member of Nutrition and Medicine Journal, Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism and Journal of Lipids. Ten PhD and 29 MSc students have graduated under his supervision. His current research activities study the impact of nutritional interventions against the metabolic syndrome, gut and lung inflammatory diseases, and environmental toxicants

Abstract:

There exists a high risk for colorectal cancer for individuals who frequently eat grilled meat containing elevated levels of heterocyclic amines (HCAs). HCAs are carcinogens formed in meats via the Maillard reaction involving creati(ni)ne, amino acids and sugars. The risk of HCAs exposure could be reduced by adding an ingredient during the cooking of meat to prevent their production. Population studies suggest protection against the development of HCAs-induced colon cancer by high dietary intake of flavonoids, which are found in fruits and vegetables. Dried apple peel (DAPP) is a rich source of flavonoids, which could inhibit HCAs formation in fried meats via antioxidant mechanisms. The efficacy of polyphenol-rich DAPP to inhibit formation of the 3 most abundant HCAs [2-Amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5f] quinoxaline (MeIQx), 2-amino-1-ethyl-6-phenylimidazo [4,5-b] pyridine (PhIP) and 2-amino-3,4,8-dimethylimidazo [4,5-f] quinoxaline (4,8 DiMeIQx)] during frying of beef patties was assessed after DAPP was applied at 0.1, 0.15 and 0.3% either on the surface of the patties or mixed inside the patty prior to frying. HCAs concentrations decreased (p<0.05) upon both surface and mixed applications of DAPP at all doses. Surface application of 0.3% DAPP showed greater (p<0.05) inhibitory effects on HCA formation by 68% for MeIQx, 56% for 4,8 DiMeIQx and 83% for PhIP as opposed to 41%, 21% and 60% respectively, for the mixed DAPP application of 0.3%. The present results indicate that application of DAPP in meat preparation prior to pan-frying can be a useful approach to minimize the formation of genotoxic HCAs in fried beef patties.

Zhaowei Zhang

Oil Crops Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences,
China

Title: Simultaneous detection for multiplexed mycotoxins by using immunological and LC-MS/MS in food and feed

Time : 15:35 - 16:00

Biography:

TBA

Abstract:

Multiplexed mycotoxins with strong carcinogenesis and toxicity are fatal threats in food and feed safety, and require highly sensitive and high-throughput detections greatly. Rapid immunoassay and arbitration detection methods play a critical role on two sides of one coin. In the rapid immunoassay, a series of high specific and high affinity monoclonal antibody, recombinant antibody, and nanobody against aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), ochratoxin A (OTA), and zearalenone (ZEA), etc, were developed as the key recognition reagents. Based on these specific antibodies, simultaneous detection for multiplexed mycotoxins was studied by using the Au (or Europium)-based lateral flow strip and non-fouling antigen microarray. The limit of detection was lowered down to pg mL-1 level (0.3 pg mL-1), depending on mycotoxins in food and feed samples. On the other hand, simultaneous arbitration detection method based on LC-MS/MS was investigated. Either multiplexed immunoaffinity column or solid phase extraction column was used in the sample extraction. The internal standard allowed precise determination of mycotoxins regardless of matrices. Multiplexed mycotoxins (AFB1, B2, G1, G2, OTA, ZEA, and T-2 toxin) were successfully identified by using a new multi-immunoaffinity column in a single run. Furthermore, a promising proposal was suggested to achieve the rapid, sensitive, ultra high-throughput detection of 96-384 contaminants in food and feed, including biotoxins, pesticides, veterinary drugs, etc., based on immunochemiluminescence biosensors using Hadamard transformation imaging (iHT)

Speaker
Biography:

Akos Mesterhazy is the member of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. He works since 1972 in the Cereal Research Institute. He has 46 years background in resistance research and breeding of cereals. He found that the most important toxin regulation agent is the resistance level, therefore the increase of the resistance is the key. Besides breeding, the elaboration of a more effective fungicide technology and methodology was also developed. The increase of the food and feed safety has been the centrum of his activity for decades and become an internationally acknowledged research centrum.

Abstract:

The most important food safety risks in cereals are caused by toxigenic fungi. The general experience is that high toxin contamination closely connected to susceptible cultivars. As most cultivars in common production are susceptible, it depends mostly on the weather the outbreak and severity of the epidemic and the toxin contamination. The resistance screenings in wheat verified this experience. Therefore, the question was how far the disease resistance determines toxin contamination. Thousands of commercial cultivars, and breeding lines from FHB program were tested in the past decades. The best trait to signalize deoxynivalenol (DON) reaction is the rate of Fusarium damaged kernels (FDK). Ten to 20 times differences between genotype occur regularly. The resistance to the different Fusarium spp. is the same, QTLs are species-neutral, the breeding against F. graminearum determines resistance also to the other Fusarium species. The correlation between FDK and DON is normally above r=0.80 in experimental series, indicating the decisive role of the resistance in the control of toxin contamination. However, there were found genotypes with DON overproduction and DON resistance, but their significance is of secondary importance. In maize the situation is similar, but it is more complicated. The resistance against the three main pathogens F. graminearum, F. verticillioides and Aspergillus flavus agrees seldom, in most hybrids they diverge. The genetic background is unknown. Here the agreement between infection severity and toxin contamination is more variable, larger ± differences occur in toxin overproduction and resistance than in wheat. However, the genotypes can be identified with lower risk in production. There are genotypes that have 2-4 times higher toxin contamination than others at the same infection severity. For this reason without toxin measurements no food safety risk assessment is possible. To this we need well planned tests with artificial inoculations with at least two different isolates of the given pathogens. The cultivar resistance differences are very large, 10 times or higher, so a regular screening advises us to choose the more resistant hybrids for commercial production. The lesson is the preventing of the toxin contamination is mainly the increase of the resistance. When we do not control it, under epidemic conditions the toxin contamination can be so high that its control will be impossible. Fungicides control with improved technology may give 70-80 % DON reduction in wheat. We have in Hungary medium resistant cultivars in commercial production that can be harvested with a fungicide preventive control so that no additional cleaning and other means are necessary in order to secure the food safety standard. The maize is more complicated, the fungicide protection is yet in experimental phase, guaranteed technology does not yet exists. Therefore the role of resistance is even higher. The detoxification is expensive, if works at all. Separation of FDK kernels is working in wheat in milling plants, but it increases costs and decreases yield. As ecological and epidemic risk conditions are different, the needed resistance level can be different in different continents and regions. Therefore, to secure food safety the preference of the more resistant genotypes is the key at cultivar registration test. When this required, the breeding firms should adapt to the new requirements and breed more resistant cultivars. Of course, agronomy should updated to provide efficient integrated plant management.

Break: Networking and Refreshments @16:25-16:40
  • Young Researchers Forum

Session Introduction

Catherine Bowe

Northumbria University
United Kingdom

Title: Effectiveness of cyclic heating decontamination on surfaces with different roughness

Time : 16:25 - 16:40

Speaker
Biography:

Catherine Bowe completed her PhD in probiotic viability assessment from Northumbria University in 2015 and has since been working on an NIHR funded project exploring the potential for progressive cuisine in quality of life improvement for head and neck cancer survivors. In addition to this, she is actively contributing to research in the Food Engineering and Separation of Actives lab at Northumbria Univeristy. Her research interests include flow cytometry, microbiology, food chemistry and microscopy.

Abstract:

Consumption of fresh produce has been associated with several food scares, such as recent deadly outbreaks of Listeriosis and E. coli. Aside from the severe consequences for public health, foodborne outbreaks also have a significant economic impact, particularly for the country of origin of the contaminated agricultural produce. It is of paramount importance to develop and apply decontamination technologies to assure product safety and maintain consumer trust in fresh produce. Exposure of fresh produce to high temperatures for a short time over a number of cycles can be used to decontaminate surfaces. One key advantage of cyclic heating is that heat dissipation is confined within a few millimeters of the surface; avoiding significant deterioration of the product’s fresh like appearance. The effectiveness of cyclic heating decontamination on surfaces with different roughness was investigated. Heating was practiced by immersion in water at 95°C for 8 s in multiple cycles. Melon flesh and polypropylene were used as model surfaces of different roughness and hydrophobicity. Surfaces were inoculated with vegetative cells of B. subtilis prior to cyclic heating and viability assessment was conducted using both plating and bacterial flow cytometry. Our results revealed a significant impact from surface roughness on the effectiveness of decontamination. Greater than 5 log reduction was accomplished on polypropylene surfaces within the first 3 cycles whereas less than 4 log reduction was possible for high surface roughness. Effectiveness of cyclic heating decontamination compares favorably to conventional decontamination methods where antimicrobial agents such as chlorine, chlorine dioxide and ozone are used.

Speaker
Biography:

Kathy Van Den Houwe graduated as Bio-Engineer (in Chemistry and Bioprocess Technology) at the Free University of Brussels. In September 2012, after some research on the stability of migrants in food simulants, for the University of Ghent and the ILVO (Institute for agricultural and fisheries research), she started working for the Scientific Institute of Public Health (WIV-ISP) in Brussels. This job is a combination, carrying out tasks for the Federal Agency for the safety of the food chain and doctoral research, again both related to Food Contact Materials.

Abstract:

Food packaging is becoming increasingly complex in their design and composition. The direct contact, and in many cases the indirect contact, between the food packaging and the food, yield the transfer of relative low molecular weight compounds such as photoinitiators. Photoinitiators are commonly used in the formulation of UV-cured inks for short drying times. Hence, photo-initiators can also be present in recycled materials, even though the packaging itself has not been printed with UV-cured inks. Evaluation of the migration of chemical contaminants in food by recycling is necessary but very challenging due to the complexity of the matrix and the wide variety of foods that need to be analysed. When a food contact material is not yet in contact with food, the contact material can be checked for compliance using food simulants. In this contribution, a kinetic study was performed to evaluate the performance of Tenax® as a food simulant for the migration of photoinitiators from paper and board towards cereals by comparing the simulation according to Regulation (EU) No 10/2011 against the actual migration into cereals. Conventional migration testing resulted in different migration patterns for different photoinitiators, which were probably caused by the presence or absence of certain functional groups. Real conditions for the migration of photoinitiators towards cereals were seriously overestimated by the conventional migration testing. These overestimations can be reduced by applying a contact temperature of 40°C. Furthermore, changing the pore size of Tenax® had no impact on the migration of photoinitiators.

Evamaria Melcher

University of Bonn
Germany

Title: Food safety and quality audits – Are audit findings predictable?

Time : 16:55 - 17:10

Speaker
Biography:

Evamaria Melcher has completed her Engineering Diploma in Agricultural Sciences from the University of Bonn. Since 2012, she is working in the Life Science Department of the worldwide operating certification body DNV GL. She accompanied more than 30 food supplier audits. She successfully completed the IRCA approved training course, “Lead Auditor, Food Safety Management Systems, ISO 22000: 2005” and the RSPO-endorsed “RSPO Supply Chain Certification Systems training course”. In the end of 2014, she began with her PhD studies concerning the audit culture in the food industry at the University of Bonn.

Abstract:

In today’s certification world food safety and quality audits play an important role to assure reliable products of high quality along the entire value chain. This study focusses on food safety and quality related findings which have been detected during announced and unannounced audits. The most common findings during food audits shall be identified through the analysis of selected audit reports of IFS Food audits in 2014 and 2015. The data sets were provided by the IFS Management GmbH, a private sector standard owner. The IFS Food is internationally accepted and one of the largest food safety and quality standards worldwide. During data analysis, special categories of findings have been defined to differentiate between the types of deficiencies. Taking into account these categories, their gravity and their occurrence plus their possible avoidance during the audit and during the normal production operations, it shall be examined if there is a certain dependency in terms of company scopes. Furthermore, the empirical data, collected through online surveys of auditors and audited companies, shall support the results from the analysis of the IFS database. First results indicate that the most common findings during food audits can be allocated in one of the following four categories: Risk of contamination, general hygiene aspects, structural conditions and pest control. In addition, initial investigation revealed that companies with certain product scopes tend to have more serious deficiencies regarding food safety and quality aspects. This study offers relevant future-focused recommendations for both food companies and auditors.

Małgorzata Przygodzka

Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research-Polish Academy of Sciences
Poland

Title: Analysis of Maillard Reaction Products as Markers of Quality and Safety of Bakery Products Based on Buckwheat

Time : 17:10-17:25

Speaker
Biography:

Małgorzata Przygodzka is a technologist in Sensory Laboratory at IAR&FR PAS in Olsztyn. She has completed MSc in Chemistry from Warsaw University and PhD in Food Science from IAR&FR PAS in Olsztyn. She is an author of 11 papers in peer-reviewed journals and has been a member of The Polish Chemical Society.

Abstract:

The Maillard reaction (MR) is responsible for the development of color, taste and aroma of thermally treated food. Besides these positive, the negative aspects of Maillard reaction has been investigated. The MR can limited the bioavalibility of some proteins and decrease the amount of Lys, Arg and His in final product. The group of undesirable compounds formed via MR contains furosine, fluorescence intermediary compounds (FIC), carboxymethyllysine (CML) and acrylamide (ACR). In addition, the accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in human is believed to caused the development of chronic diseases. However, it is said that polyphenols from natural sources can reduced the progress of undesirable MR products formation. Whereas it was proved that buckwheat and its products can be a rich source of natural polyphenols (e.g. rutin). In this study, formation of undesirable compounds of MR was studied in innovative cakes formulated from common buckwheat flour (Fagopyrum esculentum). For the characterization of the Maillard reaction progress, markers as available lysine, furosine, CML, fluorescence of intermediary compounds and AGEs formation were analyzed. Moreover ACR analysis was conducted. The studies showed protective effect on lysine blockage, which was connected with increased polyphenols content in elaborated cakes. In the other hand, loss of nutritional quality of buckwheat-based cakes was noted due to the formation of CML and fluorescent intermediatory compounds at the advanced stage of MR. However, the inhibitory effects of AGEs formation by cakes extracts was confirmed. The AGEs inhibitory effect was highly correlated with rutin content in iv vitro models about 80%. Formation of a moderate level of ACR was found, but no relationship with polyphenols content was noted.

Speaker
Biography:

Khalil Mahfouz Saad-Allah completed PhD. Presently, he is working as Professor in Tanta University, Egypt. He has published more than 20 papers and is an Editor of reputed journals.

Abstract:

This study was performed in order to explore the possible role of Halimeda opuntia aqueous extract in amelioration the deleterious effects of cadmium stress on Eruca sativa (rocket) during seedling stage. Seeds of E. sativa were primed with 10% aqueous extract of the chlorophyte H. opuntia or in distilled water for 3 h and sown in clay sandy soil (2:1 w/w). Plants were irrigated with tap water for 14 days then received 20 mM CdCl2 or tap water to the age of 40 days. The results showed that cadmium stress resulted in a significant reduction in water content, photosynthetic pigments, soluble sugars and soluble proteins. However, presoaking in H. opuntia extract exerted positive impact on the previous parameters in case of cadmium-unstressed treatment. Additionally, the interactive combination of cadmium stress and algal extract showed a significant amendment of cadmium stress on water content, photosynthetic pigments, sugars and protein contents. However, cadmium stress caused a significant increment in stress indices represented in proline, phenolic compounds and MDA, while priming in H. opuntia extract relatively declined these indices. Priming in the algal extract prior sowing protected E. sativa seedlings against cadmium-induced toxicity. SDS-PAGE of proteins in leaves showed alternation in protein profile in treated plants represented in appearance and disappearance of specific bands.

Speaker
Biography:

Ana Mornar obtained her PhD in 2007 from University of Zagreb, Croatia. She is an Associate Professor in the Department of Drug Control and Analytics, Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, University of Zagreb, Croatia. She has published 37 scientific papers in respected journals, 4 book chapters and more than 90 posters in conferences. She gave several lectures as invited speaker in the international congresses. She has been serving as an editorial board member of several scientific journals. Her present work is focused on development of LC/MS/MS, GC/FID, GC/MS and AAS methods for quality control of food, beverages and dietary supplements.

Abstract:

In recent years, chromatography and mass spectrometry have gained a wide recognition as a sensitive, selective and fast techniques for the analysis of a wide range of food and dietary supplement (DS) products. An overview of our recently developed chromatographic and mass spectrometric methods used in food and DS analysis will be given. As counterfeiting of DS has become an important health and economic problem, a fast-screening DI-MS method for identification of various pharmacologically active ingredients was developed. Red fermented rice is used worldwide as an alternative therapy for hyperlipidemia. The recent discovery of a mycotoxin, citrinin, causes much controversy about the safety of these products. The LC/DAD/FLD/MSn method for determination of 5 monacolins and citrinin in a single run in food and DS have shown high deviations between labeled and found content. Despite recent efforts of regulatory authorities to improve the safety of DS, evaluation of ethanol is not harmonized. The sHSS-GC-FID method was applied for analysis of 93 samples. High amounts of ethanol were found in products for young children as well as in ˝alcohol-free˝ products. GC and HPLC methods for evaluation of the volatile compounds and food additives in blackberry wine were developed. Devastating results were obtained as several samples contained methanol above the permissible limits. Although olive growing is a traditional agricultural sector in Mediterranean countries, most of oil is obtained by small producers without production control. A low cost sHSS-GC-FID method

Haya Alayadi

King Saud Universty
Saudi Arabia

Title: Step up your organization through ISO-22000

Time : 17:55 - 18:10

Speaker
Biography:

Haya Alayadi has completed Masters in Health System and Quality Management, Saudi Arabia and the second in Dental Public Health, UK. She is a Lecturer in King Saud University, also Chairman of Quality in the Dental Health Department.

Abstract:

International accreditation is a tool to maintain the quality in any organization. For an organization in a food chain this could be though undergoing the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), mainly ISO-22000 or the Food Safety Management System (FSMS), which aims to provide an internationally recognized standard for food safety management system that would assure food safety. The implementation start with quality improvement plan that includes the following requirements: prerequisite program, hazard analysis critical control point and management system process. This lecture aims to provide the practical implementation process for ISO-22000, taking into account planning and requirements of food organization seeking accreditation.

Speaker
Biography:

Saidi Radhwane has completed his PhD from Blida University and Post-doctoral studies from the same University. He has published more than 13 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of repute.

Abstract:

The study was carried out to investigate the phenotypic and genotypic identification of in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of 21 Staphylococci (10 Staphylococcus aureus and 11 Coagulase Negative Staphylococci) isolated from bovine mastitis to 12 antimicrobial drugs frequently used in veterinary medicine in Algeria. Isolates of Staphylococci from bovine mastitis were tested for antibiotic resistance with disc-diffusion method according to the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards guidelines in the Mueller-Hinton agar, and resistant genes mecA, blaZ, aac-aph, ermA, ermC, tetK and tetM were detected by PCR. Staphylococci isolates showed high resistance to penicillin (95.23%), oxacillin (80.95%), clindamycine (80.95%), and erythromycin (76.19%) but, no resistance was detected for gentamicin by all these strains. Among 21 isolates of Staphylococci, 20 were found to be methicillin and multidrug resistant. Multidrug resistant strains exhibited several antibiogram patterns (antibiotic I to XIII). The distribution of antibiotic-resistant genes was mecA (100%), tetM (100) followed by blaZ (42.85%). In the present work, the significant determination was the high prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococci, which were resistant to multiple antibiotics. The finding of methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS) from bovine mastitis is the first report in Algeria and revealed the status of resistant isolates in herd that might be helpful in treatment, controlling of resistant strains and for deciding culling of cows.