Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 2nd International Conference on Food Safety and Regulatory Measures London, UK.

Day 3 :

  • Symposium on " Challenges in the Detection of Food Allergens - Food Processing and Production Line Factors”
Speaker
Biography:

Balunkeswar Nayak is an Assistant Professor of Food Processing at the School of Food & Agriculture in the University of Maine, Orono, United States. He has worked as a Post-doctoral fellow in the Food Allergy Research and Resources Program at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. He received his PhD in Food Engineering from Washington State University, Pullman, WA. He is a member and has been actively involved in several committees of IFT and ASABE. He is a scientific editor for the Journal of Food Processing and Technology and Trends in Post-harvest Technology.

Abstract:

Food allergy has been reported in 5 – 8% of young children and ~4% of general population in the United States. A number of food constituents and products known as ‘Big 8’ including milk, peanuts, eggs, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, soy and wheat can cause allergy. Allergic reactions to foods account for a high proportion on emergency room visits and hospital admissions making food allergies a serious concern to public health around the world. In 2013, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of the United States published a proposed rule on the implementation of FSMA which would mandate that allergens be considered as hazards within the Hazard Analysis & Critical Control Points (HACCP) program. With the increasing prevalence and severity of food allergy, thermal and non-thermal food processing methods are sought to reduce the allergenic potency of foods. Application of thermal and non-thermal processing methods including microwave heating, boiling, high hydrostatic pressure, pulsed ultraviolet light, gamma irradiation and ultrasound methods have been reported as promising techniques in reducing allergens in some food products. However, food processing operations often lead to the denaturation of this protein making both extraction and detection. There are challenges in the recovery and detections of the allergenic residues after processing limit the exact effects of processing. The presentation will discuss various processing methods used for extraction of allergenic proteins, challenges of extraction and detection in raw and processed food matrices and implications of allergen reduction in actual patients.

Timo Wulfmeyer

R-Biopharm AG
Germany

Title: Food safety: Detect soy especially in highly processed food

Time : 10:25-10:50

Speaker
Biography:

Timo Wulfmeyer has gained profound knowledge and experience about liquid handling and ELISA and LFD systems in the field of food analysis and clinical diagnostics while working as a Product Manager and Application specialist for R-Biopharm AG, Germany. In addition to his professional background, he has completed his PhD in Molecular Biology at the TU Darmstadt, Germany and the University of Milan, Italy.

Abstract:

Soybean and its products are widely used as ingredients in diverse food products and as technological solutions in the food industry. The molecular composition is widely used in food processes to improve functional properties such as foaming, gelling or emulsification. Soy is suggested as an allergen which can cause severe allergic reactions, therefore soybeans and their products are listed in annex IIIa of the EU directive on labelling of foods. It is also listed as a major food allergen by the FDA (USA) labelling regulations. Due to the wide use of soybean products in the food industry, cross-contact to soy free products may occur. Cross-contamination is a major reason for recalls in the food industry, therefore it is important to check production lines for these sources of soya. Sensitive and fast lateral flow devices are able to verify cleaning in production lines and are easy to use, also for untrained personnel. The RIDA®QUICK Soya (R7103) dip stick is an easy and quick tool for such purposes, which can especially be used for the detection of highly processed soy proteins (LOD: 0.5 μg/100 cm2) and samples. Soy is often used as processed material, since raw soy beans are harmful after consumption. The RIDA®QUICK Soya specifically detects denaturized soy proteins from raw soybeans, flour, protein concentrates and various other products made from soybeans. Hence, LFD are reliable test systems for swab testing in hygiene control and food testing.

Break: Networking and Refreshments @10:50-11:05
  • Track 1: Food Safety Regulatory Affairs
    Track 8: Advances in Food Management
    Track 10: Impacts of New Development in Food Industry
    Track 11: Food Preservation, Quality Standard and Food Management Systems
    Track 12: Novel Foods, Processes and Nanomaterials
Speaker
Biography:

Rakia Aladi holds a BSc in Food Management and currently working as a middle class Food Security Officer with OK FOODS Cameroon. Presently, she is working on farmers indigenous practices for conserving and preserving Gnetum africanum (commonly known as Eru) in the humid forest zones of Cameroon. She has worked for 6 years in this domain and is very ambitious to gain more expertise in this field.

Abstract:

Traditional approaches for conservation and preservation of Gnetum africanum was assessed by a survey of 15 villages (three per region) in the humid forest zone of Cameroon. Four major land use systems {evergreen forest, degraded forest, bush fallow (10years and over) and food crop fields} were identified as major niches for the species. The distribution of the plant stands varied from region to region. Gnetum africanum is intensively harvested (up to four times per week through the year) and reported to generate substantial income (average US$ 2,630 per household annum). Indigenous practices used by farmers to protect the specie include selective clearing during land preparation for cropping, sustainable bark harvesting of stands in wild population, transportation of wildings, artificial propagation and recognition of individual property ownership on certain wild stands. Methodology includes 15 villages randomly selected in 5 regions (three villages per region) of the humid forest zone of Cameroon spanning 90 households. These households were randomly sampled by interview using a questionnaire focusing on the farmer awareness of the specie (as compared to other species), the exploitation regimes (mode of harvesting and utilization), the revenue and the conservation strategy (traditional practices used by farmers to protect and maintain the plant population). Field measurement was done based on the following aspects: habitat or preferred niches of the specie (place where the specie is usually found and harvested) and the specie frequency per niche (how often the specie is found in their habitat as compared to other species).

Shiqiong Chen

Beijing Haidian District Products Supervision and Inspection Institute
China

Title: Survey of aflatoxin M1 in commercial milk and dairy products in northern China

Time : 11:30 - 11:55

Speaker
Biography:

Shiqiong Chen completed Ph. D. degree in Food Science and Nutrition Engineering Department, China Agricultural University, 2005 Her research interests are research of rapid detection methods in food inspection, including detection of common foodborne microorganism, GM ingredients in food, Authentic test of food ingredients, food additives et al..

Abstract:

Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) contamination in milk and dairy products is a potential risk for human health. From 1st January, 2011 to 30th September, 2015, 3218 milk and dairy products were bought randomly from supermarkets in north part of China. AFM1 in these products was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the positive samples were confirmed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The results showed that the concentration of aflatoxin M1 in one yogurt sample was 0.80 μg/kg, and that in one raw milk sample was 0.5 μg/kg. Those two products were unqualified for consumption according to GB 2761-2011. These survey results indicated that because the climate in northern China is usually dry, the feedstuff to cattle which had gone mouldy and had been contaminated by Aflatoxin B1 is unusual. So the milk and dairy products contaminated by Aflatoxin M1 is also unusual.

Speaker
Biography:

Alessandra Bertoli is a Researcher at University of Pisa-Department of Pharmacy (SSD Pharmaceutical Biology; ERC Plant Science). She completed her Master’s Degree on “The Quality System in the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory” (University of Parma); Post-doctoral Position at the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences-Faculty of Pharmacy (University of Calabria); PhD on Science and Technology in Medicinal Plants (University of Pisa); Degree in Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Technologies (University of Pisa). She is involved in national and international Research Projects and is an invited Lecturer. She is the Co-author of more than 100 publications (book chapters, articles, posters and oral communications).

Abstract:

Botanical authentication has to be considered as a fundamental step to guarantee the consumer safety of botanical food supplements. Nowadays, National and International Pharmacopoeia as well as EMEA, ESCOP, and WHO commissions provide monographs on several medicinal and aromatic plants to get information on their traditional uses and quality control guidelines. EFSA compendium establishes the list of medicinal and aromatic plants which it is possible to include in botanical food supplements sold in the European market. Due to the enhancing industrial interest consistent with the continuous customer's trusted approach to "natural products", the scientific research community has required urgently to provide suitable protocols and procedures in the quality control of the plant raw material and derivatives during the whole productive and marketing chains. Multidisciplinary research studies combining botanical, agronomic, and phytochemical analysis should be promoted in order to guarantee important results in the establishment of feasible and effective quality control procedures, international certification and, consequently, in the identification of customers' health risks.

Speaker
Biography:

Sibu C Padmanabhan has completed his PhD in 2005 from Cochin University of Science and Technology and Post-doctoral studies from Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. He is currently working as Reseach Fellow at University College Cork, Ireland. He has published more than 15 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as referee for a number of RSC and Elsevier Journals.

Abstract:

Prolonging the shelf life of food is one of the biggest challenges the food industry is facing, which when improved could decrease food decomposition, add value and also help ease food sustainability concerns. This talk would present a possible methodology for integrating antimicrobial functionality onto some of the existing polymer based food wrapping materials. The antimicrobial activity of nanoparticles, including silver, that have been integrated onto the polymer substrates using some green chemicals, would be discussed along with the pros and cons of using it for food packaging based on results.

Speaker
Biography:

C N Ohalete is an Assistant Professor working in Department of Microbiology, Imo State University, Owerri.

Abstract:

Two cassava varieties TMS98/0505 (white) and TMS05/0473 (yellow) were processed into four different products each. The Microbiological analysis and sensory properties of the products from both cassava varieties (Garri, fufu, flour and tapioca) were examined. Microorganisms identified and isolated from the samples include; Enterobacter spp., Staphylococcus spp., Klebsiella spp., Bacillus, Lactobacillus, Proteus vulgaris, Micrococcus spp., for bacteria identification while the fungi identified include Penicillium spp., Aspergillus spp., Rhizopus spp., Mucor spp. These microbial composition and the sensory properties were evaluated. The total microbial count ranged from 9.0×102 cfug-1 for sample 1 (produced from white cassava variety) to 4.8×102 cfug-1 in sample 5 (flour produced using white cassava variety). The samples showed combined positivity and negativity to the morphological, microscopic and biochemical test processes for bacteria and fungi. The sensory properties evaluation had values of results ranging from 6.3±1.2 to 2.61±1.2 with sample 4 having the highest value while sample 2 had the lowest value and differing significantly (p>0.05) texture ranged from 6.1±1.7 to 4.07±1.8. However, overall acceptability ranged from 6.31±1.8 to 4.10±1.2 for sample 8 and sample 6 respectively. The overall acceptability showed significant difference at (p<0.05) among all other samples.

Speaker
Biography:

I Matle is working as an Assistant Professor in Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute, South Africa.

Abstract:

The Hygiene Assessment System (HAS) is an audit checklist that is used to measure the hygiene status of the abattoir. The final HAS score for individual abattoirs is graded to a sum of 100, and is interpreted as a measurement of the potential risk to public health. Theoretically, the final HAS score reflects the likelihood of safe meat being produced in that specific abattoir on the day of audit. The aim of the study was to test the association between the HAS scores and the bacteriological contamination in 6 single species high throughput abattoirs in the Free State province. This was done to validate the efficiency of the HAS score as a measure for meat safety and to determine the extent to which HAS audit score and bacteriological tests mirror each other. Each abattoir was visited once and the audit was performed according to official HAS: Four carcasses were sampled at 4 different carcass sites at 3 processing stations; and 10 direct air samples were collected from the slaughter floors. All the abattoirs showed compliance with the meat safety legislation since the total HAS scores ranged from 68 to 94. However, it was found that the effectiveness of HAS audits as a measure of food safety was questionable, since it does not demonstrate the risk/impact of non-compliance. The microbiological analysis for both carcass and air samples included the test for aerobic plate count (APC), E. coli, Salmonella species and Staphylococcus aureus. The APC for the abattoirs ranged from undetectable to 9.9x104 CFU.m-2 for carcass surfaces and for bioaerosols it was 0 to 2.4x102 CFU.m-3. The total count for E. coli, S. aureus and Salmonella species exceeded the national maximum acceptable limits. These results highlight the possibility of the occurrence of foodborne diseases in the human population. In addition, the relationship between E. coli, S. aureus, Salmonella spp., APC, and total HAS scores, revealed no significant relationship. These findings further justify the fact that HAS audits should not be used as a measure of meat safety. The results also suggested the importance of the inclusion of bacterial tests in meat safety audits because a high HAS score does not signify that meat is entirely safe for human consumption.