Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 4th International Food Safety, Quality & Policy Conference Dubai, UAE.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Afaf Kamal-Eldin and Sami Ghnimi

United Arab Emirates University, UAE

Keynote: The criticality in lipid oxidation and antioxidation

Time : 10:05-10:40

OMICS International Food Quality 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Afaf Kamal-Eldin and Sami Ghnimi photo
Biography:

Afaf Kamal-Eldin is a Professor in Food Science specialized in the area of bioactive compounds in foods. She has led research in the area of lipid oxidation and antioxidation since 1996 and has published a large number of original papers and review articles on the subject. After 20 years of research at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, she has joined United Arab Emirates University in 2010. She has edited 3 books in the area of lipid oxidation and published a total of 175 publications including original research, reviews, and book chapters. She has supervised 17 PhD theses and 14 MSc theses.

Abstract:

Deterioration of unsaturated fatty acids as a result of oxidation is a major problem in foods and other biological set ups including human organs and tissues. The accepted mechanism divides the course of lipid oxidation into induction, propagation, and termination periods. The induction period is the most important but until recently was the least understood. Our research has illustrated the importance of antioxidant polarity and concentration in agreement with the “Polar Paradox” theory suggested by William Porter in 1990. This theory was later refined by Edwin Frankel “Interfacial Phenomena” and by McClements & Decker to define the role “Association Colloids”. We have defined the role of micelles as important microenvironments that, depending on the hydrophobic lipophilic balance (HLB) of their constituents, will affect the rate of lipid oxidation. The minor compounds those are present as part of the lipids individually plays a role according to their HLB, molecular size, and concentration. In other words, microenvironments (or micro-emulsions) act as nano-reactors for the oxidation of lipids auto-catalyzed by product lipid hydroperoxides. Our research have shown that the size of micelles increase during the induction period up to the critical point, critical micelle concentration (CMC), where micelles break down pointing the change to the propagation phase, where the rate of the reaction increases exponentially. Thus, a certain criticality associated with the stability of the micro micelles in lipids governs the induction period of lipid oxidation in bulk oils. This finding opens new doors for studying the supra-molecular chemistry of lipid oxidation in different settings.

  • Symposium
Location: Salon I & II

Session Introduction

Hussein Galal El Din Ali

Ain Shams University, Egypt

Title: The origin of the anthocyanidins high antioxidant activity

Time : 10:55-11:55

Speaker
Biography:

Hussein Mohamed Galal El-Din Ali has completed his Master’s (1982) in Biochemistry from Agricultural Biochemistry Department, Ain Shams University, Egypt and PhD in Organic Chemistry from Michigan State University, USA, 1990. He is working as a Professor of Chemistry in Agricultural Biochemistry Department, Ain Shams University, Egypt from 2000 till date, and served as Head of the Department (2007-2010). He is member of the Permanent Scientific Committee of Promoting Professors and Associate Professors Egypt (2008-2010). He served as Visiting Professor at Umm Al-Qura (1994-2000) and Dammam Universites (2010-2015) SA. He is regular referee of some reputed journals (IF 2.0-4.0). His research experience is in: Agricultural & Food Chemistry, Enzyme Kinetics & Inhibition, Computational Chemistry, QSAR and Spectroscopy. He has published more than 40 papers, most of them in international journals with IF 1.0-4.5.

Abstract:

Anthocyanidins are flavonoid natural products responsible for the red to purple colours of many vegetables, fruits and flowers. Because of their poly-phenolic nature, they possess good antioxidant activity where some of them are more potent antioxidants than vitamins E and C which enables them to provide protection against many chronic diseases. Most experimental works have observed improved antioxidant activity as a result of the presence of 3-hydroxyl group and/or catecholic moiety that can donate two-hydrogen atoms and forms stable quinones. DFT calculation was performed to identify the favored path of the two-hydrogen atom donation process and determine the roles of the 3-hydroxyl group and other OH and OMe groups in stabilizing the resulted radicals and thus controlling the antioxidant efficiency in a series of 3-oxy-(and de-oxy) anthocyanidins with catecholic and non-catecholic moieties. Results showed that all 3-oxyanthocyanidins were nonplaner while their 3-radicals were planer that allows better unpaired electron delocalization and explains the lowest BDE of 3-OH group in all the examined anthocyanidins. In non-catecholic compounds, the presence of two stabilizing OMe groups ortho to 4’-OH causes the two-hydrogen atom donation to take place through 3, 4’-OH; otherwise, the donation occurs through 3, 5-OH. In all catecholic anthocyanidins, it was found that two-hydrogen atom donation through 3, 4’-OH path was more favored than that of the catecholic hydroxyl groups (4’, 3’-path) by 10-23 Kcal/mol while the role of the catecholic 3’-OH is stabilizing 4’-radicals by H-bonding. HOMO and spin density distribution supported the stabilization of 3, 4’-diradicals.

  • Special Session
Location: Salon I & II

Session Introduction

Miro Smriga

International Glutamate Technical Committee (IGTC), Belgium

Title: Safety and efficacy of food-added monosodium glutamate: Science update

Time : 11:55-12:55

Speaker
Biography:

Miro Smriga has obtained his PhD in Pharmaceuticals from the University of Tokyo (Japan) in 1997. He had worked as a Scientist and a Regulatory Manager of Ajinomoto Group in Japan, Europe and the USA. He has been deeply involved with food safety issues, evaluation of food additives, enzymes and safety of amino acids. Moreover, he has been the Scientific Secretary of “International Glutamate Technical Committee” (IGTC) since April 2015. His responsibilities included scientific project management and scientific issues pertinent to monosodium glutamate and amino acid safety as well as use. He has published 40 peer-reviewed articles in neurosciences, nutrition and toxicology and authored 7 patents. He has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of the peer-reviewed Journal “Amino Acids”.

Abstract:

The amino acid glutamate has been added to food in various complex forms for centuries. A typical example is fish sauce with history reaching back to the Roman Empire. The sodium form of glutamate, monosodium glutamate (MSG), has been commercialized since 1909. In spite of a long history of use and the fact that glutamate is a key ingredient of savory seasonings, many food scientists know little about MSG and even less about its taste, umami (2). A number of scientific articles published recently across South Asia, Africa and Middle East reported rodent findings with pharmacologically applied MSG and derived erroneous conclusions on harmfulness of food MSG. Thus, the purpose of this presentation is to summarize safety science and the recent progress in understanding the role of MSG. Research which has been conducted over the last 40 years, in animals and humans, supported by both government and industry, has led regulatory bodies across the world to the conclusion that MSG is safe in the food supply. Among others, the lack of effects of food-added glutamates on the brain functions stems from a “simple” but critical aspect of glutamate metabolism. Less than 5% of orally ingested glutamate is absorbed from the gut into the systemic circulation. The rest is used as an oxidative substrate by the intestinal mucosa. Plasma glutamate levels therefore do not rise when glutamate is ingested in the normal diet as glutamate in dietary proteins or as free glutamate in the form of MSG. The Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) assessed the safety of MSG as early as 1987-1988. JECFA concluded that the total dietary intake of glutamate does not represent a hazard to health and that the establishment of a numerical Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) was not necessary. The European Community’s Scientific Committee for Food confirmed MSG safety in May 1990, and established “a group ADI not specified” for glutamate and its salts, including MSG. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) views MSG added to food as GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe). Substances such as salt and pepper are all classified in the same section as MSG. In terms of safety, the basic food technology concepts are also important. Food intake of glutamate from protein sources range from 10 to 20g per day, whereas the amounts added as a flavor enhancer (free forms that include MSG) are between 0.5 – 3.0 g only. Because glutamate metabolism does not depend on its food source, it is disproportional to argue that MSG alone is the “wrong form” of glutamate. Finally, flavor-enhancing effects of MSG are dose-dependent, self-limiting and dependent on food matrix in which MSG is used (5). This means that using high quantities of MSG is detrimental to flavor properties of food and that MSG can be used only in specific food applications.

  • Oral Session 1
Location: Salon I & II
Speaker

Chair

Ilias Giannenas

Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece

Session Introduction

Lidia Sas Paszt

Institute of Horticulture, Poland

Title: Beneficial microorganisms: An opportunity to improve the yielding quality of crop plants

Time : 12:55-13:20

Speaker
Biography:

Lidia Sas-Paszt has experience in research projects and R&D projects carried out in collaboration with academic and industrial partners in Poland and abroad. Research achievements in implementation of R&D results: studies in the area of rhizosphere and nutrient management strategies in fruit and vegetable crops, development of microbial inocula and bioproducts for horticultural production. She has represented Poland in the Program Committee of the European Commission in FP6 (2002-2006) and in the Program Committee of the 7th EU Framework Program (2007-2012), expert of EFSA – European Food Safety Authority (2007-2012), expert evaluating research projects/reports of the 6th and 7th EU Framework Programs (2002-2013) and Horizon 2020 (2014-2020).

Abstract:

Research Institute of Horticulture is the birthplace of Poland’s first bank of symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi and beneficial bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere of horticultural plants growing in different soil and climatic conditions of Poland. Studies have shown high effectiveness of the beneficial microorganisms collected in SYMBIO BANK in the stimulation of vegetative growth and yielding of horticultural plant species. Some bacterial strains have a protective effect against Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium oxysporum and Verticillium dahliae. The most effective strains and species of microorganisms are used as components of the newly developed biological preparations: bio-stimulators, composts, and bacterial and mycorrhizal inocula. The use of chemical means of plant production e.g. synthetic NPK fertilizers, have been shown to have a negative effect on the occurrence and activity of beneficial soil microorganisms. The resources accumulated in SYMBIO BANK include strains of fungi belonging to 30 species of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Further identifications will include 53 thousand AMF spores, 1418 strains of bacteria and filamentous fungi. The mechanisms of action of beneficial microorganisms include the formation of siderophores (500 strains), spores (125 strains), dissolution of phosphorus compounds (200 strains), decomposition of cellulose (40 strains), atmospheric nitrogen fixation (100 strains). Knowledge of the role of symbiotic microorganisms that have the greatest influence on the availability and uptake of nutrients will contribute to the development of sustainable plant cultivation methods. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of the applied fertilization combinations, including the use of microorganisms, on the growth and yield of selected species of vegetable plants, the amounts of micro-and macro-elements in them, and the size of microbial populations in the rhizosphere soil. The results of the field experiments demonstrated a positive influence of the organic method of cultivating vegetable plants with the use of beneficial microorganisms on the occurrence of beneficial groups of microorganisms in the rhizosphere of those plants, including increase in the population of diazotrophs and in the population of spore-forming bacteria. Bio-preparations stimulating the vegetative growth and yield of vegetable plants and having a protective effect were developed. As a result of the application of beneficial microorganisms in organic cultivation significantly higher yields of the tested vegetable species were achieved, with better storage and processing qualities compared to conventional production. Vegetables of high health-enhancing (biological) and industrial (processing and storage) qualities were obtained. An eco-friendly technology of vegetable cultivation based on the use of beneficial microorganisms and natural plant extracts will be implemented into horticultural practice in Poland.

Leon Jansen

Dutch Choices Foundation, The Netherlands

Title: The international use of front of pack labels on food products to stimulate healthier choices

Time : 14:00-14:25

Speaker
Biography:

Leon Jansen obtained his MSc in Food Technology, PhD in Toxicology from Wageningen University and performed Post-doc research at the WHO International Agency for Reserach on Cancer (Lyon, France) and at the Dutch Cancer Institute. For five years, he was the Toxicologist of the Netherlands Nutrituion Centre. In 2006, he joined the Schuttelaar & partners and worked on the launch of the Dutch Choices Foundation. Since then, he is scientific coordinator of Choices International Foundation and the Dutch Choices foundation. This work is partially financed by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research, in the program of Social Responsible Innovation.

Abstract:

The incidence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), like cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, obesity and cancer, is still rising in the world; not only in well developed Western countries, but also in Latin America, The Middle East, Africa and in Asia. These diseases have been correlated with a too high dietary intake of saturated fatty acids, trans fatty acids, sodium, added sugar and energy, or a too low consumption of fibers. Governments are looking for tools to reduce the incidence of NCDs. Also the WHO asked food producers to make the healthy choice the easy choice for consumers. Already over 20 years ago, this led to the development of a Front of Pack (FoP) symbol indicating food products with relatively better amounts of the above mentioned nutrients. Nowadays, in many countries these kind of FoP symbols are used or in development. There are several appearances of FoP-logo’s around the world, all with a slightly or more different set up of the criteria system behind the logo. There are also other less directive FoP symbols used that leave the interpretation of the healthiness of the product more to the consumer. In the presentation an overview will be given of different kind of logos around the world and some insights in the effectiveness of the Dutch Choices logo will be presented.

Speaker
Biography:

Ilias Giannenas is a Veterinarian holding a lectureship at the Veterinary Faculty of Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. He is particularly interested in issues of Applied Poultry Nutrition. He is the author or co-author of 2 books, 7 book chapters, 48 papers in refereed journals and more than 100 conference papers. He served as reviewer in more than 50 journals, Member of the Editorial Board in 2 international journals and evaluator for several international funded projects. He has been several times an invited speaker in national or international Congresses or Conferences. His work has 880 citations and H index: 20.

Abstract:

Aim: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of oregano or attapulgite on growth performance, intestinal microbiota and architecture as well as the breast and thigh meat composition and oxidative stability.
Methods: A total of 240, one-day-old, broiler chicks were used in a 42-day trial. Chickens were randomly distributed into three treatments with four replicates of twenty chickens per pen: Control group; Attapulgite group; Oregano essential oil group. Several parameters of growth, intestinal functionality and meat quality were evaluated.
Results: The results showed that dietary inclusion of oregano improved body weight gain, feed conversion ratio but lowered feed intake. Oregano group had also higher weight at slaughter breast compared to other groups and higher oxidative stability in the breast and thigh meat after one and four days of refrigerated storage and total phenols in the breast and thigh meat, compared to the control group. Cell proliferation in the duodenum and the jejunum was also higher compared to the other groups. Attapulgite group had better oxidative stability in the breast and thigh meat after one and four days of refrigerated storage, compared to the control group. No significant differences were found in the chemical composition of breast and thigh meat among the different groups.
Conclusion: Finally, intestinal morphometry values and intestinal microbiota counts were not different among the experimental groups. In conclusion, dietary supplementation with oregano essential oil could be a potential additive to improve growth of chickens and enhance chicken meat oxidative stability.

Mirela Kopjar

Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, Croatia

Title: Influence of disaccharides and pectin addition on antioxidant activity of phenolics

Time : 14:50-15:15

Speaker
Biography:

Mirela Kopjar has completed her PhD in Food Technology from Josip Juraj Strossmayer University in Osijek. She completed her Post-doctoral studies at INRA, Dijon, France. She is an Associate Professor at Faculty of Food Technology. She has published more than 50 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member in several journals. Currently, she is a Principal Investigator of the project entitled “Trehalose fruit product improvement”.

Abstract:

Food systems are very complex matrix and interactions between components have high impact on antioxidant activity of phenolic compounds. The aim of this study was to evaluate influence of addition of disaccharides, sucrose (S) and trehalose (T) or/and pectin (P) on antioxidant activity of catechin (C) or/and quercetin (Q) model systems after preparation and during storage at room temperature. Antioxidant activity (AA) was determined by DPPH, ABTS and FRAPS method. Those methods have different mechanisms of action thus different results were obtained. AA determined by DPPH method was higher in systems of C or Q when sugars or pectin was added than in systems of pure phenolics. In system CQ synergistic effect was observed, also when sugars or/and pectin was added the same effect was observed. During storage C system had the same AA, while Q system had lower AA. Systems C, Q and CQ with addition of sugars had higher AA. In all systems with pectin addition higher AA was determined, except in the case of trehalose addition where very low AA was determined. AA determined by ABTS method in C systems with sugars or pectin decreased, and increased in the case of Q system occurred in comparison to pure phenolics system. During storage, AA in systems C decreased while in systems Q increased. Systems CQ with pectin AA decreased while with sugars addition AA increased. AA determined by FRAP method was lower in systems of C or Q when sugars were added, and no synergistic effect was observed in system CQ. With addition of pectin, lower AA values were determined in all combinations. During storage systems of C or Q and with sugars addition had lower AA. When pectin was added, C system had the same AA, and Q system higher. All combinations had lower AA. The results of our study showed the importance of food matrix composition as well as interactions that can occur between them.

Yavuz Bulent Kose

Anadolu University, Turkey

Title: Biological activity of Salvia virgata Jacq

Time : 15:15-15:40

Speaker
Biography:

Yavuz Bulent Kose received his MSc degree in 2001 from Osmangazi University Graduate School of Science. He received his PhD from the Anadolu University Graduate School of Science. Currently, he is working as Associate Professor at Anadolu University Faculty of Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical Botany Department. He has published about 30 academic papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

The genus Salvia L. (Lamicaeae) represented approximately 960 species all over the world while there are 99 species 55 of which are endemic in Flora of Turkey. Some species of the genus are consumed as herbal tea and some are used for traditional therapeutic purposes. Some members of the genus are an important export commodity. Dried herbal parts of S. virgata which were collected from Mersin, Turkey, 2014, were macerated with methanol at 25°C for 24 h. After evaporation of the methanol parts dry extract was used for LC-MS/MS analysis. Phenolic compound determination was performed using a Shimadzu 20A HPLC system coupled to an Applied Biosystems 3200 Q-Trap LC-MS/MS instrument equipped with an ESI ion source was used in the negative ionization mode. Separations were performed on a ODS 150 x 4.6 mm, i.d., 3 μm particle size, octadecyl silica gel analytical column operating at 40ºC at a flow rate of 1 mL/min. Aerial parts of S. virgata were hydrodistilled to obtain an essential oil that was then analyzed simultaneously by GC and GC/MS. Anticandidal and antibacterial effects of the oil and methanolic extract of aerial parts of S. virgata were evaluated against pathogenic Candida and bacteria strains by using CLSI M27-A2 and M7-A7 protocols respectively. Rosmarinic acid, was determined as the main compound of methanol extract while Caffeic acid, Luteolin glucoside were identified tentatively. Borneol (19.48 %), Camphor (14.64%), α-Pinene (8.9%) were found as major components of essential oil.

Speaker
Biography:

Feng Chen obtained his BS from Shanghai Oceanic University in 1990, and MS from Jiangnan University in 1992. He was awarded the PhD degree from Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA, 1998. After finishing his Post-doctoral research in LSU, he became a tenure-track Assistant Professor in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition of Clemson University in 2001, and promoted to Associate Professor in 2007 and full Professor in 2011. He has served as a university Faculty Senator between 2011 and 2013 and college Faculty Senator Leader in 2013-2014, as well as the President of Jiangnan University Alumni Association in North America (JUANA) between 2013-2015. His research interests focus on Food Chemistry, particularly Functional Food and Food Flavors. He has published 150 SCI papers and 9 book chapters, edited 2 books. In addition, he has been awarded and licensed 5 US patents and 2 international patents. During the last 10 years, he has hosted 31 international visiting scientists and 10 international student exchanges. So far, he has advised 14 PhD and 13 MS students. He has also been serving as a review panel member for the Chinese National Natural Scientific Foundation (CNSF).

Abstract:

Ochratoxin A (OTA) and citrinin (CTN) are very important mycotoxins and often found in the same food and feed stuff. OTA exposure may lead to genotoxicity and carcinogenicity, while CTN is noticed by its nephrotoxicity. In the present study, individual and combined cytotoxicity of OTA and CTN against HEK293 cells were determined by the MTT assay, which showed a toxicologic synergism caused by the interaction of OTA and CTN. In addition, the results revealed that CTN led to the HEK293 cells accumulated in G2/M stage, and the combined treatment of CTN and OTA led to a dramatic increase in S and G2/M stages, but OTA treatment alone could not induce the cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, the HEK293 cells suffered by individual and combined treatment of OTA and CTN were performed transcriptome and MicroRNA sequencing with illumina Hiseq2500 platform, which indicated 133 miRNAs and 266 target genes were significantly involved. The expressions of certain miRNAs and target genes were also validated by quantitative real-time PCR. The correlations between miRNAs and their target genes associated with apoptotic signaling were furthermore analyzed by pmi-RB-REPORTTM luciferase assay system. This study provided intensive molecular evidences on toxicological basis of OTA and CTN poisoning to human HEK293 cells.

Speaker
Biography:

Fernanda Galgano is an Associate Professor of Food Science & Technology at the School of Agricultural, Forestry, Food and Environmental Sciences, University of Basilicata, Italy. Her research activity has focused on several issues of food quality, food safety, food processing, food packaging, besides the shelf-life evaluation of many food products, from a sensory and chemico-physical point of view. Nowadays her research activity is focused on the study of the microencapsulation process of bioactive ingredients in food matrices. She is author/co-author of more than 80 scientific publications, (book chapters, research articles, reviews, congress presentations) with more than 940 citations. She is referee of several international journals. She lectures in “Food Processing Technologies” and in “Evaluation and management quality in food industry: module of quality and plant sanitation” for undergraduate and graduate students at the Course of “Food Technology”, University of Basilicata, Italy.
 
Roberta Tolve is a Nutritionist and is attending third year of her PhD course in Agriculture, Forestry and Food Science curriculum Food Science, Technology and Biotechnology at the University of Basilicata in Italy. She obtained her degree in Food Technology (2010) from the University of Basilicata and her Master’s degree in Human Feeding and Nutrition Sciences (2013) at the University of Perugia, both with honors. She attended the laboratories of Professor Zhibing Zhang at School of Chemical Engineering of the University of Birmingham, and she started working on the phytosterols microencapsulation. Her main current research interests lies in nutraceuticals, functional foods and chemistry of natural matrices/product. She has 4 scientific papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Microencapsulation is defined as “the process in which small solid particles, liquid components or gaseous materials are coated or entrapped within another shell material”. Due to the presence of the shell material, the core is isolated and protected from external environment. This promising process is used in the pharmaceutical, agricultural, cosmetic and recently in the food industries. Among the various techniques used for microencapsulation, those most commonly employed are spray drying, extrusion, emulsion and fluid-bed coating. In food science, microencapsulation involves the incorporation in small capsules of natural ingredients, such as omega-3, phytochemicals, amino acids, peptides, probiotics, enzymes, prebiotics, antioxidants, vitamins and minerals. In this way the bioactive compound is protected from the external environment, then improving its processability, controlling the release mechanism of the core materials, enhancing probiotics survival and masking undesired odors or tastes. The shell materials for food application must be Generally Recognised As Safe (GRAS) for human health. Examples from literature include carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. Moreover, in recent years, the use of functional and health-promoting shell materials is becoming increasingly important. Among the food ingredients that have been encapsulated, limited information about the phytosterols is available. Phytosterols are lipophilic compounds, well-known for their cholesterol-lowering activity. Because of their chemical structure, phytosterols are subjected to oxidation, especially when exposed to heating or to a long-term storage. This process leads to the formation of compounds, namely phytosterols oxidation products (POPs), which reduce the cholesterol-lowering action of phytosterols and may have toxic effects. In addition, it must be considered that the incorporation of phytosterols in food is complicated because of their chalky taste and water insolubility. These problems can be overcome by using microencapsulation process. In this contest, the phytosterols microincapsulation as ingredients for formulation of functional foods will be discussed.

Pushpa S Murthy

Central Food Technological Research Institute, India

Title: Mycotoxin contamination of spices and food safety
Speaker
Biography:

Pushpa S Murthy is presently working as a Senior Scientist at Department of Spices and Flavor Science. She received her PhD degree in Biotechnology at Mysore University, India and also recipient of UNU-Kirin fellow from United Nations University. Her primary field is Microbiology and Biotechnology with research emphasis on Food Biotechnology. Her research work involves production of value-added products, food and pharmaceutical components, bioactivity evaluation of the isolated plant extracts or synthesized compounds on food borne pathogenic microbes and application of the bioactive molecules for food safety. She holds patents, process know –how and is the author of peer-reviewed papers, book chapters, and reviews. She is a fellow of Society for Applied Biotechnology, member of Association of Microbiologist of India, Society of Biological Sciences and also Association of Food Scientist and Technologist of India.

Abstract:

Food safety and security are important issues worldwide due to growing request of food at global level and the need to ensure basic levels of safety. Spices have been used for flavoring foods and beverages. They play an important role in the national economy of several of the producing, exporting and importing countries. Tropical climatic conditions under which spices are grown offer a favorable environment for the fungal and mycotoxin contamination. Mycotoxins are natural toxins formed by fungi that can grow on crops in the field, post harvest agricultural processing, industrial processing conditions and storage. Mycotoxins are stable compounds and therefore they cannot be eliminated from those foodstuffs. Thus, it is important to maintain the contamination of mycotoxins in food at the lowest achievable level. Spices such as dried or dehydrated forms of chilli, nutmeg, turmeric, pepper and ginger are traded predominantly in the international market and are contaminated with higher concentrations of mycotoxins. Mycotoxins identified in spices are ochratoxin A (OTA) and aflatoxins (AFT) followed by citrinin, sterimatocystin, zearalenone or T-2 toxins. Prioritization of food illnesses, spoilage, safety prevention and reduction or minimize mycotoxin contamination throughout all stages of the spices production from primary stage consumer use International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) have classified aflatoxins and Ochratoxins as carcinogenic to humans. Apart from GAP, GMP, HACCP, physical treatments, use of chemical compounds is a very effective strategy to prevent mycotoxin production. Novel multidisciplinary integration of know-how and technology as a horizontal task and synergic action by disseminating technological solutions developed by the research activities and to address geographic target areas affected by mycotoxin problems will be discussed.