Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 7th European Food Safety & Standards Conference Athens, Greece.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

John Tsaknis

Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Greece

Keynote: The role and the evolution of quality management systems in the food industry

Time : 10:00-10:35

OMICS International Euro Food Safety 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker John Tsaknis photo
Biography:

John Tsaknis has completed his Ph.D. and Postdoctoral studies from Lincolnshire University, School of Food Sciences and is a chartered chemist from the Royal Society of Chemistry, UK. He is full professor and Dean in the School of Food Technology and Nutrition in Athens Greece. He is a member of the Standing Committee "Residues and Chemical Contaminants" in the International Dairy Federation (IDF) and Reviewer of 7 international scientific journals. He has published more than 40 papers in reputed journals and participated in more than 30 international conferences and has been serving as an editorial board member of reputed journals.

Abstract:

The evolution of the HACCP system during the second half of the twentieth century, from its roots in the U.S. space program to its present use for consumer foods worldwide, can be traced through several milestones and through a series of formal recognition and adoption activities by the food industry, government regulatory agencies, and national and international scientific and professional organizations. The changes that HACCP has undergone have built a complete food safety management system (FSMS) with increased efficiency and effectiveness. It is well established nowadays that FSMS are not enough and Quality assurance systems are intended to provide confidence to a food company’s management, its customers and to government regulatory agencies that the company is capable of meeting the food quality and food safety requirements. Food safety and quality assurance are now parts of Quality management systems which include quality planning and improvement activities, in addition to quality control and assurance activities. These systems are intended to provide a company with the capability to meet all quality requirements. In this study, the evolution of Food Safety programs into Quality Management systems is described

Keynote Forum

Jose S Torrecilla

Complutense University Madrid, Spain

Keynote: Estimation of food quality during transportation and storage

Time : 10:35-11:10

OMICS International Euro Food Safety 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jose S Torrecilla photo
Biography:

Jose S. Torrecilla presently working as a professor of the Chemical Engineering Department of the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM). He has done Ph.D. with honors in Chemical Engineering from UCM in 2000. Advanced Technician in Occupational Risk Prevention and Integrated Management Degrees were achieved in 2005. In 2017, he got his MBA degree with honors. Modeling complex systems for many fields such as health, chemistry, and food technology is his main line of research, which is done in collaborations at national and international levels.

Abstract:

Extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) is known for its beneficial properties in nutrition, making the quality control of this food a relevant task. In this regard, three different high-quality grade Spanish EVOOs (As Pontis, Marqués de Valdueza, and Empeltre), which are currently exported to the USA, were monitored under three different temperature conditions (3ºC, 40ºC, and room temperature) in order to simulate potential situations which EVOO undergoes during shipment and storage. The different temperatures led to distinct modifications of the optical properties of the EVOO samples, which were analyzed by means of absorption visible spectroscopy and neural network models. These modifications also depended on the time span in which the EVOO withstood a given temperature. The final algorithm is a non-linear mathematical tool that has been employed to relate the UV-vis absorption with temperature and exposure time. The intensity of the UV-vis absorption spectra peaks, which are originated by the chlorophylls and carotenoids present in EVOO, decrease with time and temperature. Generally, the results reveal that higher temperatures lead to a faster degradation of EVOO when compared to lower ones. This data was utilized to design, optimize, and validate an artificial neural network, capable of distinguishing the time and temperature conditions that EVOO samples suffered. This technique is fast, user-friendly, cost-effective, as well as non- destructive, meaning that it could have a direct impact for the real-time quality control of edible oils during their distribution chain, as ideal conditions could be found and implemented.

  • Workshop

Session Introduction

Thiago Zilli

Food Safety Council Coordinator, Brazil

Title: Supermarkets role on society: Food safety and security
Speaker
Biography:

Thiago Cabral Zilli is a Veterinarian graduated from the Federal University of the State of Rio de Janeiro (UFF) and completed his MBA in Business Management at Getúlio Vargas Foundation (FGV), ISO 22000:2005 Lead-Auditor by Det Norske Veritas (DNV) - IRCA certified; Integrated Management Systems (ISO 9001, OHSAS 18001, ISO 14001), Internal Auditor for SQS Consultants and Associates and Organizational Consultants for the Getúlio Vargas Foundation. He has 10 years of professional experience in food quality management area - both in industry and retail. He worked on licensing and certification of production to foreign markets; analysis, development, training, implementation, validation, standardization and monitoring of quality systems; strategic optimization of operational flows, increasing productivity and quality and reducing waste generation and costs; internal and suppliers’ audits; reduction of customer complaints and of Food Safety infractions and their severity; improving adaptation to legal food safety requirements, considering the available technical and operational feasibility, and improving the companies’ images before consumers and regulators.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Food wasted by supermarkets, and its economic and social impacts were analyzed. Literature points out that reducing food waste is one step further to ensure Food Security. However, Food Safety (FS) must be allied as to prevent Foodborne Illnesses (FBI). The purpose of these notes is to understand how Rio de Janeiro (RJ) state’s Supermarkets Association  (ASSERJ), through its FS Council - composed by Quality and Operational Managers of the Associated Supermarkets (AS) - and interaction with enforcement agencies, plays active role in reducing FBI cases as well as reducing hunger and the need for balanced diet of the low-income population.
 
Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: Observations were made through reports of sales, losses, product discards and donations to the Niterói’s, a city from RJ state food bank. Literature about the importance of practical methodologies aimed to help reducing food waste was also considered.
 
Findings: ASSERJ, through its FS Council, aligns technical understandings of current FS laws and operations between AS and the governmental bodies municipal, state and federal. This led to greater understanding of actual FS risks and its importance to processes’ standardization amongst AS, improved inspections’ assertiveness (less arbitrariness) and bettered products’ quality and processes. There was also reduction of discarded goods by fiscal actions and of the food wasted by each establishment and of operations’ costs; the latter would still be complemented by recent partnerships between many AS and Niterói’s food bank - ensuring Food Security, for the most needy population, through donations of commercially devalued (but sensory and microbiologically fit for consumption) foods.
 
Conclusion & Significance: The proactivity and representativeness of ASSERJ are responsible for FS and Quality of food supplied daily to more than 10,000,000 people in RJ’s state, besides contributing to food losses’ reduction, at the same time in which acts on Food Security.

  • Special Session

Session Introduction

Cristina Lopez

Veterinary College, Uruguay

Title: Microbiological quality of vacuum-packed and refrigerated beef
Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

The present study had a main objective to evaluate the bacterial growth of microorganisms indicating hygienic-sanitary quality and spoilage in chilled (0 – 4oC) and vacuum-packed beef. We study the detection and quantitation of total aerobic mesophilic, total coliforms and Brochothrix thermosphacta for a 120 day. Ninety strip loin (Longissimus dorsi) samples from two different slaughter plants authorized to export were used. Those samples were packed and kept under refrigerated conditions. The samples were analyzed in the Laboratorio de Microbiología de los Alimentos de la Facultad de Veterinaria -Universidad de la República on days 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 105 and 120. Growth of microorganisms previously mentioned was evaluated together with the maintenance or loss of vacuum, temperature and the presence or absence of odor when opening the bag of each sample. The growth medium used for these analyzes were Plate Count Agar (PCA) for the standard plate count of Aerobic mesophilic microorganisms, Violet Red Bile Agar (VRBA) for total Coliforms plate count and Streptomycin Thallium Acetate Actidione Agar (STAA) for plate count of Brochothrix thermosphacta. In conclusion, we can say that all microorganisms studied obtained initial counts (day 0) within the accepted national and international limits. In terms of total aerobic mesophilic, its average exceeded the limit of 7 log CFU/g for both slaughter plants on day 120. By the other side, total Coliforms did not reach the limit of 2 log CFU/g considering the average of both slaughter plants. Brochothrix thermosphacta increased towards the end of the study as it was expected, since it is alternative bacteria. These counts were produced thanks to the good storage conditions, low initial load of microorganisms, proper pH after maturation and proper vacuum packaging.

  • Food, Nutrition & Health | Characterization of Food Hazard | Biotechnological Exploitation in Food Safety | Food Safety Regulatory Affairs | Challenges of Food Safety & Hygiene
Speaker

Chair

Ioannis Karapanos

Agricultural University of Athens, Greece

Speaker

Co-Chair

Dimitra Gennimata

National School of Public Health, Greece

Speaker
Biography:

Charalampos Proestos has completed his BSc in Chemistry at University of Ioannina, Greece and MSc in Food Science at Reading University, UK. He obtained his PhD in Food Chemistry at Agricultural University of Athens (AUA), Greece, where he continued his Postdoc working on natural antioxidants on programs funded by EU and Greece. After further training at Wageningen University, The Netherlands, he worked as a Research Associate at AUA. He worked as a Chemist for the Hellenic Food Authority (EFET), being food industry Auditor and Supervisor of the Chemical Laboratory in Athens accredited with ISO 17025. Currently he is working as an Assistant Professor in Department of Chemistry, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. He has published more than 40 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of more than 10 repute journals.

Abstract:

NMR metabolomics and spectrophotometric studies (Folin–Ciocalteu, FRAP, ABTS) are implemented to infusions and decoctions of plant species to assess and compare the metabolic and antioxidant profiles for each botanical family. Multivariate and univariate data analyses highlighted the differences among the samples and pinpointed specific classes of compounds for each plant species as well as infusions and decoctions. The identified phenolic compounds by NMR, as well as the antioxidant profile, framed a trend of increased values in infusions compared to the decoctions. Furthermore, the infusion procedure positively affected the extractability of the phenolic compounds compared to decoctions. The highest total phenolic content (TPC) was found in Mentha spicata, while the lowest in Matricaria chamomilla preparations, irrespective of
the preparation method. The preparation time for the decoctions was examined showing that the 15 min preparations were generally found richer in phenolics and of higher antioxidant activity.

Speaker
Biography:

Dimitra Gennimata is a Pharmacist, working in a hospital setting since 1996 and offering services as an External Scientific Associate to the National School of Public Health since 2006. She has completed her Postgraduate studies in Public Health (MPH, Health Education and Promotion), Teaching and Counseling Certificates from the School of Pedagogic and Technological Sciences and her PhD thesis is in the field of Microbial Genetics and Clinical Pharmacology (Molecular Mechanisms of Microbial Resistance to antibiotics). She is particularly interested in Public Health and Patient Safety, having actively participated and been involved in relative European projects and fora.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Food safety violations at the consumer stage are common and nearly 40% of food-borne outbreaks occur in the domestic setting. Health-related behavior develops through childhood and adolescence and once settled in adulthood is hardly changed. Practices in safe handling of food usually rely on beliefs, skills and material environment. Education programs have been proved to be an effective, science-based and sustainable strategy to help children mitigate risk, thus reducing the health burden from food-borne illness in Europe (e-Bug project). The development of relevant educational resources for adolescents and young adults is included as a goal in the EU funded SafeConsumE project (2017-2022).
 
Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: Important food safety educational opportunities and messages are presently being identified by the relevant SafeConsumE work packages. Educational materials and programs for teenagers and young adults will be developed for use in the classroom and at home and will be tested with educators and students throughout development. All educational resources will be available, free of charge, after development, evaluation and endorsement by relative authorities nationally and in Europe.
Findings: Research on what educational resources regarding food hygiene and safety are available in Europe for teenagers and young adults exhibit significant diversity in scope, extent and orientation. Schools, educators and students are being recruited in four European countries to access needs for educational resources and evaluate skills, beliefs and the impact of the material environment on food safety education.
 
Conclusion & Significance: Educational programs increasing skills and knowledge and aiding teenagers to handle food safely could play a role in the development and implementation of dynamic, sustainable and inclusive policy models that stimulate and support national and EU level initiatives, regarding food hygiene and safety. Overall, the SafeConsumE project aims to support transformation towards a more healthy population and cost-efficacy by reduced foodborne illness, and a more sustainable community by less food-waste and environmentally friendly solutions.

Speaker
Biography:

Derek Watson is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. He is the Founder of the Business Clinic within Sunderland Business School and leads the University’s Doctoral Research Fridays’ programme. He has extensive experience in innovation and technology transfer and mapping skills requirements in emerging food sectors. In addition, he has extensive links and networks as a result of sourcing and embedding external engagement opportunities across the curriculum, with an international portfolio of clients and contacts, such as the British Cabinet Office, Indian Government Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Dubai Police, Canon International. His research focuses on academic-industry collaboration. He has been appointed on the editorial board of several International Journals. He is also a visting Professor at Sias Business School Academy for Open Innovation International University in China and a Senior Research Fellow at Cyprus Centre for Business Research.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: In theory, food safety is a critical measurement, not just for an economic and legal reason but also for the moral integrity of the organization. However, in reality, the number of accidents or incidents particularly in the food manufacturing sector is a serious cause for concern. The problem is further compounded with the onset of Brexit. Given the floundering UK Government’s negotiation talks and the pending conservative leadership challenge, it has resulted in a climate of uncertainty, a devaluation of currency and economic instability. Food manufacturers along with other commercial businesses are reluctant to further invest until the economic future is more transparent. In consequence, food manufacturers are seeking efficiency saving, whilst aiming not to compromise food safety compliance. Whilst there are areas of best practice, sadly there is an increasing number of examples in which failure to comply with food safety is resulting in loss of business, severe injury and in certain cases fatalities. This paper addresses Food Safety Cultural Compliance within UK Food Manufactures and identified cores issues that hinder the establishment of a proactive food manufacturing safety culture.
 
Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: The research study adopts a mixed method approach in which five UK food manufacturers were consulted via a series of consultancy reflections.

Findings:The data collected clearly indicates a commitment to food safety compliance. However, the majority of organizations struggled to maintain consistent levels of food safety compliance despite implementing costly training and development initiatives. Their strategic and operational drive to both enhance and maintain a positive food safety culture was also undermined with the uncertainty of economic pressures and the quagmire of Brexit. The paper concludes with a series of commercially viable recommendations within the context of the Brexit divorce and provides a clear contribution to the community of practice.

Speaker
Biography:

Yagmur Nil Demirel has completed her PhD at Afyon Kocatepe University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Food Hygiene and Technology in June 2016. She has worked on microorganisms which are isolated from natural microbiota from fermented sucuk. She has published five research articles, three reviews and is a referee to researchers’ articles about food hygiene and microbiology. She has been carrying out some projects in her field.

Abstract:

In this study, it was aimed that molecular characterization of Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus sake, Lactobacillus curvatus and Staphylococcus xylosus which were isolated by classical culture methods from produced traditional sucuk dough’s natural microbiota in Afyonkarahisar. A total of 16 different sausage dough samples were collected at different times from different
companies that produce sausage by traditional methods in Afyonkarahisar. L. plantarum, L. curvatus, L. sake and S. xylosus were isolated from the samples by evaluating various biochemical characteristics. Selected isolates were identified as species by PCR. According to the results of the study, 57.1% L. plantarum, 28.6% L. sake, 14.3% L. curvatus and 5% S. xylosus were identified. It was thought that the isolation of L. plantarum more than L. curvatus and L. sake could be related to the better adaptation of the meat environment. S. xylosus was inoculated at the same rate in the experimental sucuk groups due to development of color and aroma. According to the results of the study, the composition of sucuk dough, production process, fermentation condition, maturation parameters are important criteria affecting the adaptation of microorganisms to sucuk doughs.

Speaker
Biography:

Suzana C S Lannes is Associate Professor III at Pharmaceutical Sciences School at University of São Paulo. She is President of Brazilian Society of Food Science and Technology-sbCTA, and Vice President of Brazilian Association of Rheology. She has published papers in reputed journals, book chapters, and has been serving as Editor in Chief of Food Science and Technology-CTA Journal. Develop research works in the Food Science and Technology area, on the following subjects: rheology, physics of foods, development of special and nutritional food formulations and study of fats and some fat foods.

Abstract:

Food security exists when all people at all time have access to sufficient, safe, nutritious food to maintain a healthy and active life. Food and agricultural industries add value to and increase demand for farm outputs, in that way contributing to poverty reduction and food security. Food and nutritional insecurity in Latin America and the Caribbean continue be treated by the challenge for reducing of its population affected by hunger, and its complete eradication by 2025. Over the past 20 years, the Latin America and the Caribbean region has significantly increased its share in global agricultural trade. Forecast models show the region could take an even larger role as a global food and agricultural produce supplier. Infrastructure, trade regulations and institutions are among the most significant constraints for future expansion. Food security is consistently seen as one of the key challenges for the coming decades. By the year 2050, the world will need to produce enough food to feed
more than 2 billion additional people, compared to the current 7.2 billion. Most of the population growth will be concentrated in developing countries, adding pressure to their development needs. To meet future food demand, agricultural production will need to increase by 50-70%, according to different estimates. And this will happen as the impacts of climate change are projected to intensify overall, particularly hitting the poorest and most vulnerable countries.  Increasing global food production will be just a part of the story. The other side is trade, or more precisely, ensuring that food exports from countries with a natural comparative advantage can increase and reach those most in need. In this context Latin America and Caribbean can meet this global challenge: Providing knowledge, technologies, materials and technological systems to increase the base structuring knowledge and promote innovation in agribusiness with a focus on food safety and new fronts opened by food technology, food quality, nutraceutical and functional foods.

Speaker
Biography:

Esra Kaya presently a PhD student studying at University of Nottingham, Uk.

Abstract:

Recent studies have shown that Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) improve the postharvest quality and shelf life of the food products by promoting bioactive compounds like Vitamin C, beta-carotene, lutein, alpha-tocopherol, anthocyanin, and total phenolic production while increasing the nutrient quality of plants. Bioactive compounds are the secondary metabolites giving the color, aroma, and the taste of the plants in addition to inducing the pathogen resistance. LEDs emitting specific bandwidths are promising for greenhouse plant cultivation and food preservation due to its minimal thermal effects and high photon flux. In this study, we aim to cultivate three duckweed species (Lemna minor, lemna gibba, and Wolffia arrhiza) to demonstrate the antioxidant compound production in wastewater environment under the red, blue and red/blue LEDs. We focus on the potential use of LEDs in the production of bioactive compounds boosting the quality of plant-sourced foods and microbial safety for the post-harvesting period.