Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 7th European Food Safety & Standards Conference Athens, Greece.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Massimo Cecaro

Italian Medical Press Association, Italy

Keynote: Evolution of the Massi care model nd prevention in the area of food safety 2.0 using augmented reality

Time : 10:05-10:40

OMICS International Euro Food Safety 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Massimo Cecaro photo
Biography:

Massimo Cecaro after completing his high school in humanistic studies, he moved to the University of Camerino, where he got a Master’s Degree in Veterinary Medicine and in University of Teramo he successfully got the Specialization. He obtained a qualification to practice as a Journalist and in 2007 he was admitted to the National Association of Medical Press (ASMI), where he currently hold the position of Vice President and General Secretary. He is Resident Member of MJA Medical Journalists’ Association (London). He is a member of EFSA's expert database and has been an invited speaker, mentor and chairman at international events in the field of Public Health and Safety in Canada, US, Europe and Asia. He has authored several scientific works in public health and he is also a Director in Italy of a prestigious educational centre for work safety and public health. He is actively involved in international projects to improve the role of mass-media in medical sciences, and awarded in Philadelphia, Valencia and Las Vegas with international special recognition. He is serving as an Editorial Member of several reputed journals.

Abstract:

The speed of information in recent years has become a necessity for the consumer. Clear and timely guidance must be provided taking into account scientific developments and technological progress. The evolution of the MassiCare model would allow a new model of risk analysis to cross data and metadata. The elements considered are age of the subject, sex, geographical position (which would indicate alarms, such as reminders from the competent authorities in the areas of interest), acute and chronic illnesses, convalescence. Other elements considered are the type of work activity carried out, the training acquired in food safety, which type of food is preferred and the possible cooking temperature. All these details give back a theoretical model of considerable help for the consumer in matters of food safety. The new "MassiCare AR" model, incorporates and analyzes the aforementioned elements by returning data with graphics based also on virtual images. The result of the risk assessment with augmented reality AR will be returned. On the food itself and/or on a mobile device information such as the tolerated safe dose for each individual subject or specific restrictions may be accessed. In addition to this valuable information, you can also access information about allergens.

OMICS International Euro Food Safety 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Rong Murphy photo
Biography:

Rong Murphy is the Vice President of Quality Assurance and Food Safety at Maple Leaf Farms, Inc., America’s leading producer of premium quality duck products. Previously, she served as the Vice President of Food Safety for McDonald’s (China) and in various capacities at PepsiCo, Cargill, and Campbell Soup Company. She started her Food Professional career as a faculty at the University of Arkansas. She received her PhD in Chemical Engineering and her Master of Science degree in Chemical Engineering, Food Science, and Microbiology. She is a registered and licensed Professional Engineer.

Abstract:

There is an insatiable consumer-appetite for organic, all natural, non-GMO, antibiotic free, and gluten free foods, with productions in that market segment estimated to grow by as much as 16% annually through 2020. With more food startup companies claiming organic, all natural, non-GMO, antibiotic free, and gluten free foods at unprecedented rates and major food companies pivoting to offer new products in those categories, the compositions of our foods are shifting. With this market shift, artificial preservatives, colors and dyes as well as those food ingredients that are perceived as consumer-unfriendly are being eliminated from both human and animal food products. How does this shift in food trends impact our food supply? How does this market shift modify the shelf life of our food products? and, how does this shift affect food manufacturing organizations? Food researchers and industries are hard at work to validate the food safety of these new trendy products. As new food products enter the consumer market, food manufactures will need to avoid costly recalls and potential consumer health issues by verifying food safety of products on the frontend. As food manufacturing organizations approach production, the organizations also face more considerations about various costs, quality control, and record keeping. From sourcing to packaging and further to tracking, food ingredients and finished food products are coming from all over the world. Collaboration among supply chain partners and full integration throughout networks of suppliers and customers are critical elements. Food companies that have fully integrated supply chain and customer networks are more likely to succeed, with access to the same information, working towards shared missions to deliver results, and being ahead of their competitors. Connected supplier and customer networks will allow food companies to be agile when faced with issues, responsive to recalls, and to be flexible and efficient.

  • Workshop on Application of mathematical algorithms to protect the quality of food
Location: Athina 1

Session Introduction

Jose S Torrecilla

Complutense University Madrid, Spain

Title: Application of mathematical algorithms to protect the quality of food
Speaker
Biography:

Jose S. Torrecilla presently working as a professor of the Chemical Engineering Department of the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM). He has done Ph.D. with honors in Chemical Engineering from UCM in 2000. Advanced Technician in Occupational Risk Prevention and Integrated Management Degrees were achieved in 2005. In 2017, he got his MBA degree with honors. Modeling complex systems fomany fields such as health, chemistry, and food technology is his main line of research, which is done in collaborations at national and international levels.

Abstract:

Extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) is known for its beneficial properties in nutrition, making the quality control of this food a relevant task. In this regard, three different high-quality grade Spanish EVOOs (As Pontis, Marqués de Valdueza, and Empeltre), which are currently exported to the USA, were monitored under three different temperature conditions (3ºC, 40ºC, and room temperature) in order to simulate potential situations which EVOO undergoes during shipment and storage. The different temperatures led to distinct modifications of the optical properties of the EVOO samples, which were analyzed by means of absorption visible spectroscopy and neural network models. These modifications also depended on the time span in which the EVOO withstood a given temperature. The final algorithm is a non-linear mathematical tool that has been employed to relate the UV-vis absorption with temperature and exposure time. The intensity of the UV-vis absorption spectra peaks, which are originated by the chlorophylls and carotenoids present in EVOO, decrease with time and temperature. Generally, the results reveal that higher temperatures lead to a faster degradation of EVOO when compared to lower ones. This data was utilized to design, optimize, and validate an artificial neural network, capable of distinguishing the time and temperature conditions that EVOO samples suffered. This technique is fast, user-friendly, cost-effective, as well as non- destructive, meaning that it could have a direct impact for the real-time quality control of edible oils during their distribution chain, as ideal conditions could be found and implemented.

  • Special Session
Speaker
Biography:

Charalampos Proestos has a BSc in Chemistry from University of Ioannina, Greece and MSc in Food Science from Reading University, UK. He obtained his PhD in Food Chemistry from Agricultural University of Athens (AUA), Greece, where he continued his Postdoc working on natural antioxidants on programs funded by EU and Greece. After further training at Wageningen University (The Netherlands), he worked as a Research Associate at AUA. He worked as a Chemist for the Hellenic Food Authority (EFET), being food industry Auditor and Supervisor of the chemical laboratory in Athens accredited with ISO 17025. Currently he is Assistant Professor at the Department of Chemistry, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. He has published more than 40 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of more than 10 repute journals.

Abstract:

A fully validated approach for the determination of diastase activity and hydroxymethylfurfural content in honeys were presented in accordance with the official methods. Methods were performed in real honey sample analysis and due to the vast number of collected data sets reliable conclusions about the correlation between the composition and the quality criteria were exported. The limits of detection and quantification were calculated. Accuracy, precision and uncertainty were estimated for the first time in the kinetic and spectrometric techniques using the certified reference material and the determined values were in good accordance with the certified values. PCA and cluster analysis were performed to examine the correlation among the artificial feeding of honeybees with carbohydrate supplements and the chemical composition and properties of the honey. Diastase activity, sucrose content and hydroxymethylfurfural content were easily differentiated and these parameters were used for indication of the adulteration of the honey.

  • Sessions: Food Safety, Quality & Policy | Food Spoilage & Preservation | Food Poisoning & its Control Foodborne Pathogen | Environmental Protection Co-Management with Food Safety
Speaker

Chair

Charalampos Proestos

University of Athens, Greece

Speaker

Co-Chair

Guzin Iplikcioglu Cil

Ankara University, Turkey

Speaker
Biography:

Agnieszka Jackowska-Tracz PhD, DVM, is an Assistant Professor in Department of Food Hygiene and Public Health Protection, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW (WULS-SGGW), Warsaw, Poland. She conducts research on the impact of various factors on the ability to reduce pathogens in food of animal origin, and studies on the potential use of nanotechnologies to improve the hygiene of the production environment. Her field of specialization is hazard analysis and improvement of HACCP systems. She conducts classes and lectures for veterinary students and postgraduate students in the field of safety of animal origin products.

Abstract:

The bactericidal activity of nanomaterials was evaluated using two selected pathogens which are recognized as important hazards causing non-compliances with the process hygiene criteria. As Gram (-) and Gram (+) bacterial model, C. jejuni and S. aureus were used. Strains were treated with graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) in two concentrations (200 and 400 μl/ml). The same bacterial model was used to determine the antimicrobial activity of ceramic tiles coated with photocatalyst (TiO2) layer. For this purpose, UV radiation of wavelength 253.7 nm was used. Conventionally produced tiles and tiles coated with TiO2 by means of three different methods were exposed to UV for 60, 90 and 120 sec. Quantitative bacteriological analysis was carried out to determine the surviving bacterial cells number. Results show that GO sheets, in both concentrations, present the greatest antibacterial activity among the two graphene-based materials. Reduction was observed during the first 2 hours of nanoparticles-bacteria contact. There was no evidence of increasing the loss of bacteria viability in a concentration-dependent manner. The bactericidal action of UV was much stronger on the surfaces coated with TiO2. The strongest effect was found for film prepared by APCVD method (7-log). Since the maximum bacterial reduction level was not higher than 90% (1-log), the practical use of graphene-based materials seems to be limited. Nevertheless, GO with other control measures may contribute to improve hygiene level. The use of wall tiles coated with TiO2 in plants where UV is applied should greatly improve the disinfection efficiency.

Speaker
Biography:

Paramita Bhattacharjee has completed her PhD from Institute of Chemical Technology, Mumbai; Post-Doc from North Dakota State University, USA. She pursues research on green technologies of extraction of Ayurceuticals, development of nutraceuticals in mitigating metabolic disorders, edible oils and frying applications and electronic nose applications for quality assessment of agro-commodities. She has 60 research papers in national and international journals, 8 papers in conference proceedings, 25 oral presentations in conferences including 3 in international forums (USA, London and Germany) and 10 book chapters. She has received several accolades for her degrees and work. Her ‘h’ index in Scopus web engine is 12 and ‘citation index’ is 452.

Abstract:

Black pepper, the king of spices, has wide applications in food processing, pharmaceutical and cosmetic products. Piperine is the active principle of black pepper responsible for its pungent characteristic and it reportedly possesses several physiological effects. Piperine-rich black pepper extract obtained from a-amylase-assisted supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (at 300 bar, 60°C, 135 min total extraction time and a flow rate of gaseous CO2 of 2 L/min) was encapsulated in the form of nanoliposomes for enhanced storage stability of the bioactive piperine and to allow sustained release of the same. Soya phosphatidylcholine:Tween 80 - 1:1.2 and 2% w/w (wt. of extract/wt. of nanoliposome) black pepper extract contributed to an encapsulation efficiency of 78.6% of nanoliposome. This nanoliposome compared to its counterpart formulated with standard piperine, exhibited similar size (20-30 nm) and morphology (spherical, uniform, with a visible distinct nano structure). Higher (P=0.000) value of zeta potential (-29.0 mV) of liposome formulated with black pepper extract compared to the nanoliposome with pure piperine (-25.2 mV) indicates enhanced stability of the former. The FT-IR spectra of both the nanoliposomes suggest that piperine molecules have been incorporated inside the lipid bilayer. In vitro release profiles of piperine from nanoliposomes followed Higuchi model of first order kinetics. However, the nanoliposome with extract possessed higher antioxidant potency (1.10 times) and better storage stability (2.4 times higher at 4 ± 1°C and 7.8 times higher at 70±2°C) compared to the nanoliposome formulated with pure piperine. Nanoliposome of piperine-rich extract of black pepper has shown promise as a nutraceutical in designer food applications that require minimal thermal processing (maximum temperature of 40°C) such as in wheat-based soup premix and has potential of being utilized as a biotherapeutic per se.

Speaker
Biography:

Guzin Iplikcioglu Cil has her expertise in Food Microbiology and she has been working in the Food Hygiene and Technology Department of Ankara University Faculty of Veterinary Medicine for ten years. Her thesis is about prevalence and molecular characterization of C. perfringens in chicken meat. She has studies about some important food-borne pathogens at molecular level, and her another work of interest is the antimicrobial resistance in food-borne bacteria. Also, she has publications about residue of antimicrobials and some important contaminants in foods

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Food-borne diseases are an important public health problem in most countries and, among the reasons of these diseases Salmonella is still the most common one. Poultry and poultry products are the frequent vehicles of this bacteria. Recent studies showed that antibiotic resistance and particularly multiple resistance has increased dramatically in Salmonellae. Defining sources, serotypes and antibiotic resistance of Salmonella are necessary to accurately plan and apply prevention measures. The purpose of this study is to isolate and identify Salmonella spp. from packaged broiler carcasses, wings and liver samples. Also, to determine two important virulence genes and to evaluate antibiotic resistance profiles of the isolates.

Methodology: In the study conventional cultivation and immunomagnetic separation (IMS) based cultivation techniques were used for the isolation of Salmonella from 330 chicken samples. The isolates verified as Salmonella spp. by the detection of oriC gene and identified with using malic acid dehydrogenase and DT104 specific primers as S. typhimurium and S. typhimurium DT104, respectively by PCR. The antibiotic susceptibility test of Salmonella isolates was performed with the disc diffusion method with 20 different antibiotics.

Findings: Ninety-six (29.1 %) of the samples were detected as contaminated with Salmonella spp. According to the results 11 isolates (11.4%) were identified as S. typhimurium. None of these serotypes were determined as specific phage type DT104. InvA gene was detected from all the (100.0 %) Salmonella isolates and 14 isolates (14.6 %) were detected as positive for spvC gene. 83 isolates (86.4 %) were resistant to at least 5, 70 isolates (72.9 %) resistant to at least 7, 36 isolates (37.5 %) were resistant to at least 9 antibiotics.

Conclusion & Significance: In conclusion, continuous monitoring of Salmonella prevalence and resistance in the food supply is necessary because of the public health implications of a potential hazard.

Speaker
Biography:

Eleni Kollia is a Chemist (MSc) and has her expertise in Food Chemistry/Microbiology. She received her BSc in Chemistry and her MSc in Food Chemistry from the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. She is currently pursuing her PhD in Chemistry, focusing on Food Chemistry/Food Microbiology and Toxicology. Her current research focuses on finding natural agents/compounds for reducing or inhibiting the fungal invasion of foods and crops. Moreover, her research aims to prevent the pre/post-harvest mycotoxin contamination of the crops.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Various fungi are known to contaminate products intended for human and animal consumption. Among these, A. flavus and A. parasiticus are the most common and widespread in nature and they are known to produce aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), which is the most dangerous contaminant of foods and crops due to its carcinogenic and mutagenic activity. Especially foodstuffs rich in oil content are sensitive to AFB1 producing fungal invasion and therefore they are often contaminated with AFB1. According to the literature, many plants, due to their bioactive compounds, have been shown an inhibitory effect on fungal growth and mycotoxin production.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-aflatoxigenic efficacy of Cynara cardunculus L. and Cistus incanus L. extracts in inoculated with A. parasiticus fatty food matrices. Specifically, sesame seeds and macadamia nuts were selected as substrates for the investigation of the anti-aflatoxigenic ability of C. cardunculus L. and C. incanus L. respectively. The anti-aflatoxigenic efficacy of the two plants was also investigated in the microbiological medium yeast extract sucrose (YES). Moreover, two different HPLC methods for AFB1 determination in sesame seeds and macadamia nuts were developed and validated.

Findings: The results showed that C. cardunculus L. displayed a complete inhibition of AFB1 both in sesame seeds (99.2–99.9%) and in YES medium (97.8–99.9%) while C. incanus L. inhibited the AFB1 production in percentage of 72.5-85.9% for macadamia nuts and in a percentage of 87.1-90.1% for YES medium.

Conclusion & Significance: The anti-aflatoxigenic extracts studied in this work, can be possibly used for reducing or preventing pre/post-harvest AF production and combined with good agricultural, manufacturing and storage practices could lead to a product of guaranteed quality and safety.

Speaker
Biography:

Olga Fysun has completed her Master’s degree from University of Hohenheim (Food Science and Technology) in Stuttgart, Germany. During her study at the University of Hohenheim she gained experience in Taiwan, China, Czech Republic and Poland. She is working on her PhD at the Technical University of Munich since January 2016.

Abstract:

Biofilms are populations of microorganisms that accumulate at surfaces with thicknesses ranging between several μm to mm and are typically surrounded by a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Focusing on the dairy industry, it was found that biofilms may develop in processing equipment within a few hours. Milk is a very perishable product and is susceptible to contamination by biofilms. The biofilm can accumulate in milk pipelines, storage tanks and in heat exchangers. Biofilm formation in dairy processing equipment is influenced by several factors: properties of the contact surface, temperature, pH-values, presence of other microorganisms. Pseudomonas biofilms, which are often present in filling equipment in the dairy factory concern the quality of manufactured milk. In this study, the biofilm formation was investigated using experiments that simulate the filling process of dairy products. Biofilm formation on filling a test tube with PTFE liner and stainless steel 1.4404 hose connections were tested with pasteurized milk and UHT milk inoculated with Pseudomonas fragi at several temperatures (4°C, 20°C) and Reynolds numbers (laminar and turbulent flow). The higher temperature and laminar flow showed a significant influence (p<0.05) on the biofilm development. Also, the accumulated biomass on the PTFE and stainless steel 1.4404 differs showing more biomass on the PTFE. However, the fat content of tested milk has not shown a significant relation to biofilm formation. Based on the results, it can be concluded that processing conditions should be optimized to reduce the biofilm formation in dairy processing equipment.

Speaker
Biography:

Ioannis Karapanos is an Assistant Professor of Vegetable Production at the Agricultural University of Athens. He specializes in the production, quality and postharvest physiology, technology of vegetable crops grown in the field and under cover, on vegetable seed production and the physiology of fruit-set of vegetable species. He has 36 publications in international scientific journals with referees and more than 50 papers in proceedings of international (mainly Acta Hort.) and national scientific conferences. He is a Reviewer in 12 scientific journals and during the last 5 years he has participated in 2 European research projects, a COST action and several national research programs.

Abstract:

Although cowpea dry seeds are widely consumed especially in Africa, cowpea fresh pods have insignificant economic importance. As a result, there is currently little knowledge on the quality and physicochemical characteristics of cowpea pods. We assessed several morphological, quality and dietary characteristics of cowpea fresh pods from 37 accessions of Vignam unguiculata ssp. unguiculata (common cowpea) and ssp. sesquipedalis (asparagus bean or yard long bean) originated from southern Europe, to provide information on quality and chemical properties of cowpea fresh pods and to evaluate those accessions in terms of quality traits. Accessions of the subspecies sesquipedalis produced heavier and larger pods than those of the unguiculata subspecies, and were harvested 2 days later. There were large differences among the accessions in each quality and dietary characteristic. Overall, fresh pods of most of the accessions had high quality and nutritional value, as they were rich in proteins, chlorophylls, carotenoids and phenolics, had high antioxidant activity and showed low content in nitrates and raffinose-family oligosaccharides (RFOs) which are considered as anti-dietary factors. Based on the assessed quality, dietary or anti-nutritional characteristics, no grouping of accessions was possible, as all those characteristics were independent of accession origin and subspecies. Cowpea cultivation for the production of fresh pods may pose as a competent crop, producing vegetables of high dietary value, adding variety to the diet and exploiting local populations which are widespread in southern
Europe and constitute a valuable genetic material.