Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd European Food Safety and Standards Conference Valencia, Spain.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Cecaro Massimo

General Secretary Italian Medical Press Association, Italy

Keynote: Food safety: Improving public understanding and preventing foodborne illness

Time : 10:30-11:10

OMICS International Euro Food Safety 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Cecaro Massimo photo
Biography:

Dr Massimo Cecaro after completing the high school in humanistic studies, he moved to the University of Camerino, where he got a Master Degree in Veterinary Medicine and in University of Teramo he successfully got the Specialization. Since the age of 14, he has worked as radio speaker, tv presenter and reporter for a wide range of artistic and scientific events. At the age of 24 he obtained a qualification to practice as a Journalist and in 2007 he was admitted to the National Association of Medical Press (ASMI), where he currently hold the position of General Secretary. He is Resident Member of MJA Medical Journalists’ Association (London). He is Member of EFSA's Expert Database. He has been an invited speaker, mentor and chairman at International events in the field of Public Health and Safety in Canada, US, Europe and Asia. He has been author of several scientific works in public health. He is also director in Italy of a prestigious Educational Centre for work safety and public health. He is actively involved in international projects to improve the role of mass-media in medical sciences, and awarded in Philadelphia, Valencia and Las Vegas with International special recognition. 

Abstract:

Strategic information on food safety should empower consumer healthy behaviour using new technologies. Smartphones could be used to understand what is safe or unsafe for a specific consumer and to remind what actions have to be taken to effectively reduce or get rid of the hazard.  Indeed it is the consumer's responsibility to avoid ingredients that contain allergens, allergen derivatives or that are not suitable for specific conditions.  QR code, now widely used for several different purposes, would make possible to match specific food/drink to people with limitations. This model could be integrated in every kitchen, using just a QR code reader and an app. Using this system it would be possible to create a profile that could be set considering age, sex, physiologic conditions (e.g. pregnancy) and co-morbidities with special regard to diabetes, hearth diseases, metabolic and immunodeficiency disorders. 

In an easy way, just by selecting the own expertise on food safety topic, it would be possible to receive proper scientific information, in regard to a specific condition. Barcodes, using an infrared reader, could also be used to detect microorganism, such as yeasts, moulds and bacteria in foods. Globalisation has widened our food horizon and we are now dealing with products made from all over the world that travel even several thousand of miles before they get to our kitchen. Food that sometimes are not part of our food culture and that we are not very familiar with. In that respect it is crucial to ensure respect of basic rules of food preservation and to deliver proper and clear information.

That could be provided with technology in the form of QR and IR readers that could improve food culture and prevent foodborne illness. 

Break: 11:10-11:30 (Coffee Break)

Keynote Forum

Hami Alpas

Middle East technical University, Turkey

Keynote: Non traditional intentional threats: From food safety to food defense

Time : 11:30-12:10

OMICS International Euro Food Safety 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Hami Alpas photo
Biography:

Hami Alpas is a Professor at Food Engineering Department, Middle East Technical University, Turkey. He holds an MBA degree from Dept. of Business Administration METU on Total Quality Management. He has served as a “visiting scholar” in 1996 and 1998 at University of Wyoming, USA; as a “visiting scientist” in 2001 and 2002 at Ohio State University, USA and as a “visiting professor” in 2006, 2007 and 2008 at University of Bordeaux I, France. His main research areas are: Unit Operations in Food Engineering, Non-thermal Food Processing Technologies, Food Quality, Food Safety and Food Security through Total Food Protection. He is an expert in Food Defense training activities via NCFPD (USA). He has supervised 4 Ph.D and 11 M.Sc. thesis in Food Engineering Department. He has 67 international journal articles (SCI) and over 750 citations (ISI-Web of Sci; h-factor 17) as well as close to 55 academic presentations in 35 different international meetings. He has completed 15 national, 4 international projects including EU/JRC, CNRS-EGIDE and NATO ARW/ATC projects. He has authored 7 chapters in internationally edited books and has edited 3 international books by Springer. He has also organized and co-directed 3 NATO-workshops (ARW-ATC). He is currently co-director of EU-FP7 project on “Plant Food Security”.

Abstract:

The intentional contamination of food supply poses a real threat to society. It has the potential to disrupt food distribution, loss of consumer confidence in government and the food supply. The global food system is very vulnerable, both structural and social. The bulk production and need for rapid production, sourcing and distribution at both national and international level is beyond the limits of routine food safety measures. Adapting to the additional threats arising from major environmental, climate and bioterrorizm requires an integrated food system approach. In this respect “A Total Food Protection Perspective“ will be summarized by breakdown of food safety management systems and vulnerability assessment. Food security, safety, defense, protection and quality will be linked within a food continuum by determining the countermeasures to minimize or eliminate vulnerabilities as well as enhancing the capability for surveliance, preparedness and response to intentional contamination for greater awareness and prevention.

Keynote Forum

Inteaz Ali

McGill University, Canada

Keynote: Process for preparing protein concentrates from brewer's spent grain

Time : 12:10-12:50

OMICS International Euro Food Safety 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Inteaz Ali photo
Biography:

Inteaz Alli is a Professor of Food Quality Assurance and Food Analysis. He has professional expertise in the area of food quality assurance and is a food industry practitioner in this field. His primarily research interest is in the area of isolation and characterization of food proteins. He is co-inventor and primary researcher for two patents for food protein products and the processes for preparation of the proteins for use as food ingredients. As an expert in the Food Quality/Food Safety field, he has published a university-level textbook entitled Food Quality Assurance: Principles and Practices, and several invited book chapters. He has presented numerous invited seminars and conducted invited training courses and workshops in food quality, food safety, HACCP, food proteins and food analysis in universities, food companies, government institutions and international agencies both in North America and around the world. Dr. AlIi is responsible for teaching Principles of Food Analysis, Quality Assurance and Food Traceability.

Abstract:

A method of preparing protein concentrate from brewers' spent grain comprises extracting said brewer's spent grain with sodium dodecyl sulfate to solubilize the protein thereof, and thereafter removing a substantial proportion of the protein in solution. The principal by-product of the brewing industry is brewer's spent grain (hereinafter referred to as BSG). The composition of BSG is approximately as follows: Table A Component% (dry weight basis) Moisture 7.41 Crude Protein 26.88 10 Crude Fat 8.07 Ash 4.71 Fiber 16.25 Nitrogen Free Extract 44.09 It will be seen, therefore, that protein is a major constituent of BSG, and potentially a rich source of food. Several proposals have been made in the past for recovery of this protein. For instance, in The Molson Companies Limited's U.S. Patent No. 4,315,038, dated February 9, 1982, it is disclosed that protein can be extracted from trub by extraction with an azeotropic mixture of isopropanol and water. In an article by three of the present inventors (Crowe, Alli and Baker) in the Journal of the Institute of Brewing, Vol. 91, p.l48-150, titled Solubilization of Nitrogenous Constituents of Brewer's Spent Grains, it is disclosed that up to 50% of the Nitrogen from BSG solubilized by an acid detergent (cetyl-trimethyl ammonium bromide in sulfuric acid - capable of solubilizing 90~ of BSG nitrogen) can be recovered as a solid. ~L317~13 The object of the present invention is to provide a fairly inexpensive but efficient method of preparing a protein concentrate from BSG.

  • Special-Session
Location: Valencia, Spain
Speaker

Chair

Ana Lucia Baltazar

Coimbra Health School, Portugal

Session Introduction

Ana Lúcia Baltazar

Coimbra Health School, Portugal

Title: Food safety good practices in seafood retailers in Portugal

Time : 12:50-13:35

Speaker
Biography:

Ana Lúcia Baltazar is a professor in Coimbra Health School for the graduated course of “Dietetic and Nutrition”, attending the PhD in “Food Quality” in FCT-UN Lisbon, with certifications in various pos-graduated studies, Food Safety - HACCP auditor, and a Master in Occupational Safety. A dedicated and qualified Dietitian, with ten years of experience, a strong technical background, proven in management skills and an “agent for change”. Exceptional experience in monitoring progressive food industry and providing training, knowledge of food safety requirements and quality standards in food manufacturing.

Abstract:

Fish and shellfish are an important part of a healthful diet but, as with any type of food, it's important to handle seafood safely in order to reduce the risk of foodborne illnessFresh seafood is one of principal foods available in Portugal, so the retail of this products is very common. The companies in the retail trade sector of fish and shellfish are from the 1st of January, 2006, covered by Regulation (EC) No 852/2004 of 29 April 2004, which lists the requirements to Food Safety. The Code of Practice (CP) is an important pillar for any quality system and is an integral part of a food safety program, because lists a set of good practices with the aim of produce food products safely. The CP does not replace the implementation of the HACCP system or a system based on their principles, nor a quality system, and does not guarantee the safety of a product at the time of consumption, but it is a good basis for their implementation. This article suggests good practice standards to the retail distribution of fish, allowing the companies in this sector to get to know and inform their employees, with ease, which are the acceptable / unacceptable performs.

Break: 13:35-14:30 Lunch Break
  • Food Safety & Sanitatiion | Food Borne germs & Illness | Microbiological Risk in Food | Challenges in Food Safety | Food Allergy | Food defense | Food Toxicology
Location: Valencia, Spain
Speaker

Chair

Hami Alpas

Middle East technical University, Turkey

Speaker

Co-Chair

Ana Lucia Baltazar

Coimbra Health School, Portugal

Session Introduction

Ugur Gogus

Middle East Technical University, Turkey

Title: Map for ‘drug and food’ in cancer nutrition

Time : 14:30-15:00

Speaker
Biography:

Ugur Gogus is an Associate Professor at the Department of Food Technology, Middle East Technical University, Turkey

Abstract:

Cancer, as one of the most common chronic metabolic diseases with its high death rate, seems not to have any particular diet or nutrition strategy, currently. Owing to its huge complexity in progress which involves many different reactions, pathways and proteins, in addition to a great number of bioactive compounds with their unique effects on these biochemical reactions, pathways and proteins, the necessity to clarify the interactions of the functional bioactive nutrient compounds in foods with the pathways and special proteins, has become more crucial than ever. Though we have an important number of chemotherapeutic drugs in the current status of cancer medicine, the drugs namely; sunitinib, sorafenib, 17-AAg, thapsigargin, eeyarestatin, bortezomib, metformin, tunicamycin, versipelostatin, brefeldin A, honokiol, paclitaxel, fulvestrant, doxorubicin, DBeQ, MKC-3946, MAL3-101, tamoxifen, nafoxidine, C1628, MG-132, reolysin (and many others…) with their well defined effect mechanisms and involvements in cancer pathways, their interactions with the bio-active nutrient compounds, like; I3C, lycopene, amygdalin, arginine, EGCG, vitamin D, kaempferol, genistein, tocopherol, lycopene, beta carotene, quercetin, apigenin and resveratrol, have not been properly reviewed. However, the design of an anti-cancer diet for a cancer patient during the treatment, can only be made according to the interactions between the anti-cancer drug and the bioactive compounds in the food. Each drug and each bioactive compound has different effects on the cancer triggering signalings; GRP78/BIP, beta catenin, Nrf2-keap1, ERK, Hedgehog, Rb/E2F, notch, PI3K/AKT/mTOR; the cancer triggering or inhibiting proteins; TNF, p38, p23, Bcl, GRP78, NF-kB, CDK, STAT3, Bax, MMP, Fas, erbB2, Foxo3, G6DP, STEAP, SOX2, galectine 3, CDC25, COX2, caspase, E2F3, AR, PRDX3, ERalpha, iNOS, PRDX3, IGF-1, HO-1, VEGF, GATA3, IL-1B, the enzyme systems; H2O2 fenton, phase II and CYP1A1. Therefore, first, the bioactive nutrient compounds which have the same effect with anti-cancer drug on these proteins, enzyme systems or signalings, should have been determined, and then, their food sources should form the anti-cancer diet for the given anti-cancer drug. 

Speaker
Biography:

Santaigo Benito is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Chemistry and Food Technology, Polytechnic University of Madrid, Spain

Abstract:

The classical way to make red wine is based on the use of Sacharomyces cerevisiae yeasts during alcoholic fermentation and Oenococus oeni bacteria during malolactic fermentation.  This traditional winemaking methodology produces commercial stable red wines from a microbiological point of view. However, this methodology when it is applied in grape juices with high pH, like it is common in the south of Spain, can produce high levels of biogenic amines and ethyl carbamate that can seriously influence human health. This work explains the use of a new red winemaking biotechnology that uses the combination of Lachancea thermotolerans and Schizosaccharomyces pombe yeasts as an alternative to the conventional alcoholic and malolactic fermentations. Schizosaccharomyces pombe consumes malic acid while Lachancea thermotolerans produces lactic acid in order to avoid an unnecessary deacidification in low acidic musts from warm viticulture areas such as the south of Spain. This methodology also reduces some malolactic fermentation hazards for human health such as biogenic amines and ethyl carbamate.

Speaker
Biography:

Nene Meltem KEKLİK is a Assistant Professor at the Cumhuriyet University, Turkey

Abstract:

Escherichia coli O157:H7, an enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC),  is a highly pathogenic microorganism, which causes hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome in infected humans. Ruminants, especially cattle, are known to be a major reservoir of EHEC. A substantial number of foodborne disease outbreaks related to E. coli O157:H7 has been associated with the consumption of meat products contaminated due to improper processing and handling of meat. Pulsed UV light (PUV) is a potential technology for the post-processing surface decontamination of meat products. PUV does not involve chemicals, water, ionizing radiation or heat (for short treatment times), and can be applied to food with or without package. Although the inactivation kinetics of microorganisms using PUV has been studied by a number of researchers, the information in this area is still limited. Accurate estimation of microbial survival rates by using mathematical models would help successful adaptation of this technology to industrial applications.

In this study, the inactivation kinetics of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on sucuk, a Turkish style dry-fermented sausage made from raw minced beef, was investigated. E. coli O157:H7 inoculated onto the surface of sucuk encased in collagen was exposed to pulsed UV light for up to 60 seconds at varying distances (5, 8 and 13 cm) from the quartz window of the xenon lamp in a pulsed UV-light system. The survival curve obtained at each distance exhibited an upward concavity. Accordingly, three mathematical models, log-logistic, modified Gompertz, and Weibull, were used to estimate the inactivation rates. Non-linear regression was performed to determine the model parameters. The goodness-of-fit of models was determined using root mean square error (RMSE), accuracy factor (Af), and regression coefficient (R2). Modified Gompertz model yielded the highest goodness-of-fit followed by log-logistic model and Weibull model, respectively. Modified Gompertz model produced RMSE values of 0,304-0,464, Af values of 0,937-0,985, and R2 values of 0,969- 0,981. The findings of this study demonstrated that the inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 on sucuk encased in collagen exposed to PUV follows a non-linear (upward concave) pattern and can be predicted using modified Gompertz model.

Break: 16:00-16:15 Coffee Break

Ljerka Prester

Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health, Croatia

Title: Biogenic Amines In Ready-To EatFoods And Alcoholic Beverages

Time : 16:15-16:45

Speaker
Biography:

Ljerka Prester was awarded PhD from Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health. She has extended his valuable service for many years and has been a recipient of many award and grants. Currently, she is working as a Professor& President at Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health Her international experience includes various programs, contributions and participation in different countries for diverse fields of study. Her research interests reflect in her wide range of publications in various national and international journals.

Abstract:

Biogenic amines (chiefly histamine, tyramine, putrescine, cadaverine) are present in many foods and beverages, although their concentrations vary widely. High levels of biogenic amines can occur in fermented food products (seafood, cheese, sausages, vegetables, seasonings) and alcoholic beverages (wine and beer) as the results of high and uncontrolled microbial enzymatic activity. Although some biogenic amines (polyamines such as putrescine, cadaverine, spermine and spermidine) are important in many physiological processes, a high daily intake of biogenic amines, particularly histamine and tyramine can produce toxicological effects in humans. The highest histamine content is produced in decomposed and spoiled dark-muscle fish and fermented food products. High histamine content in fish products (> 200 mg/kg) can cause histamine poisoning (scombroid poisoning). On the other hand, food intolerance and food induced migraines are associated with the consumption of moderate or low daily amine intake in susceptible individuals. In such individuals, the metabolism of histamine and tyramine is slowed down due to genetic factors, certain diseases, drug intake (antidepressants, MAO-I and DAO-I drugs) and intake of potentiators (alcohol and tobacco smoke). Interestingly, the typical symptoms of histamine poisoning, histamine/tyramine intolerance and allergy to s are similar (headache, rhinitis, diarrhoea, food product tachycardia). The selective avoidance of biogenic amine-rich foods is the universal treatment for sensitive consumers. Since histamine/tyramine intolerance is a growing problem, certifying manufactured products as histamine-free or histamine-low, would undoubtedly benefit sensitive individuals. It is also important to stress that biogenic amines are not destroyed by cooking, freezing or canning, which suggests the importance of applying the HACCP safety system

  • Young Research Forum
Location: Hall B

Session Introduction

Tanuja K. G. M. Gowda,

Department of Veterinary Public Health and Food safety,Belgium

Title: Evaluation of the microbiological quality of dry aged beef in Belgium
Biography:

Tanuja Kumari Gullahally Manjegowda has completed her master’s in Veterinary Public Health from the Maharashtra Animal and Fishery Sciences University, India. Currently, she is pursuing PhD in Ghent University. She has published 2 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Dry-aging is a process whereby meat is stored at low temperature and relative humidity for a long period of time, resulting in improved tenderness and the development of a unique flavour. The aim of this study was to evaluate the microbiological quality of dry-aged beef produced in Belgium. The crust of 29 loins at the end (n=15) and beginning (n=14) of the ripening process were sampled from 15 companies. From each loin, 25 cm² of the surface of lean and adipose tissue were sampled and analysed for total psychrotrophic aerobic bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, Escherichia coli, coagulase positive staphylococci, Pseudomonas, Brochothrix thermosphacta, psychrotrophic lactic acid bacteria, yeasts, moulds, Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes. The total psychrotrophic aerobic bacteria on the dry surface at the end of the dry aging process varied between 2.08 and 8.81 log10 cfu/cm² on lean and between 1.60 and 7.95 log10cfu/cm² on adipose tissue. Most of the lean and adipose tissue at the end of the dry aging process showed high numbers of Pseudomonas (median >4.7log10cfu/cm²), lactic acid bacteria (median > 3.7 log10cfu/cm²), and yeasts (median > 4.0 log10cfu/cm²). On more than half of the loins, moulds were found in detectable numbers (>1 log10cfu/cm2). Large variations were also seen for loins at the beginning of the dry aging process. None of the samples showed detectable levels of E. coli, Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes. In conclusion, the microbiological quality of dry-aged beef varied greatly, which emphasizes the need to identify the main factors contributing to these large variations.

Biography:

Geana Elisabeta-Irina has completed his PhD in 2015 at Bucharest University. The main current interests are identification and quantification of essential active principles like phenolic compounds, organic acids, sugars, amino acids, terpenes, micro and macronutrients in different food matrices (wine, honey, fruits, plants, organic products, functional foods) by highlighting key biomarkers used in authentication, using the main instrumental analytical (HPLC, UV-VIS, ICP-MS). She has published 16 ISI articles, 10 of them as first author), 145 citations, ResearchGate: Irina Geana, researcherID: B-5799-2012, SCOPUS ID: 56005766400

Abstract:

Fruits and fruit juices represent an important part of the human diet and because they shows a significant economic value on the market, remain among the products subject to counterfeiting practices, inducing a negative impact on the consumer and food industry. Sugars and organic acids are important components of fruits chemical composition, providing powerful tools for authenticity of fruit products. They also have an effect on the sensory properties and nutritional value of fruit products. The present study was undertaken to determine the concentration of several sugars and organic acids in different fresh fruit juices by using HPLC-ELSD and HPLC-PDA methods in order to establish the variance range of this compounds for each type of fruit juices and to create a referential database. Liniar discriminant analysis (LDA) models were constructed to classify juices according to the type of fruit, different sample locations and to distinguish between authentic, blended or adulterated juices. The developed methodology, based on fingerprinting of sugars and organic acids in conjunction with a comprehensive database and chemometric methods reveals a high potential for certification of fruit juices authenticity.

Biography:

Abstract:

A common problem encountered when designing a new product for demanding environmental conditions is specifying its leak tightness and measuring seal integrity. Package integrity implies the maintenance of the sterile barrier property of the package. In recent years, the medical device industry has worked with the FDA by providing test data to move away from biological challenge testing of finished sterile medical device packages and toward physical test methods for measuring package integrity. This study presents an overview of what mass extraction leak testing is and how it can be implemented as a test method to determine the integrity of the flexible packages in quality control or development laboratory. This presentation mainly focused on testing pouches and the correlation between mass extraction rates and microbial ingress. Furthermore, it investigates the ability of VE2 mass extraction test instrument, to identify the defected samples from good samples of LLDPE/Nylon laminated pouches and compares the results of this test with bioaerosol challenge test results. To accomplish this, four types of defective pouches with micro-channel are produced in a sealed area of pouches using tungsten wire with 0.10, 0.050, 0.025, 0.015 mm diameter with 5mm of seal length (ASTM F1929). The results of these two different tests show the VE2 instrument can detect all defected pouch with the hole bigger than 5 µm, but the results of microbial test indicated the critical size of leak for these types of packaging is 15 µm. Therefore, for testing the flexible package integrity, it is adequate that the mass extraction instrument can detect micro-channel bigger than 15 µm.

Biography:

I am the scientist from Moscow. The field of my interests is competitive advantages of the companies in the food market (especially SMEs), building of sustainable food chaines, food safety and security. I have been working on this problems for six years. I completed Specialist degree programme at School of public administration at Lomonosov Moscow State University, and have continued my studies as PhD student. I am the author of the project which won at nomination in competition of innovations  for retailers «Retail new wave», I used to work as deputy director for development in Association of food manufacturers and suppliers Rusprodsoyuz.
 

Abstract:

Consumers expect that the food available on domestic markets is safe and of the expected quality. However it is not always truth. Unsustainable food chaines and trade monopolization of the food market lead to weakening of the food security in the country. For improvement of human nutrition it is crucially important to provide people with high quality food and create the diverse and sustainable food chaines. Systems of food safety and quality management should support fair and transparent trade thereby contributing to economic development, improved livelihoods and food security. The appropriate food safety and security indicators should be used to analise quality of food chaines in different countries . There is a need to develop food safety and security indicators that are not being fully measured, including dietary quality and trade diversity, women's empowerment, health environments and food environments.

Kiniongi Kanza Arnold

Institut Facultaire De Developement “ IFAD”, Congo

Title: Toxicological concern for the analysis of health risk chemicals in food
Biography:

Abstract:

The toxicological concern corresponds to a daily dose of exposure to certain
categories of substances below which a set of toxicological investigations would
not necessarily required in a regulatory framework. This is sort of a tool
"screening"Used for substances exhibiting structural similarity to anounance evaluated. This tool corresponds to a probabilistic approach, the application can only be considered
in the case of chemical substances present at very low concentrations and for which
specific toxicological data would prove insuffisantes to conduct an assessment traditional toxicological.

Currently, several European and international bodies to apply this approach evaluation of chemicals in food to low concentrations.