Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Conference on Food Safety and Regulatory Measures Birmingham, UK.

Day 3 :

  • Track 8: Public Health, Food Fraud and Consumer Perceptions
    Track 9: Challenges to Food Hygiene and Safety
    Track 10: Pest Management
    Track 11: Foodomics Approaches in Food Safety
    Track 12: Novel Foods, Processes and Nanomaterials
Speaker

Chair

Ian Thomas

6 Pump Court,United Kingdom

Speaker

Co-Chair

Philip Pond

Safe Food Production Queensland, Australia

Session Introduction

Carla Vartanian

American Overseas Dietetic Association
Lebanon

Title: The impact of mass media in food safety and health care change

Time : 10:00-10:20

Speaker
Biography:

Carla Vartanian is certified in Clinical Bioethics from Harvard Medical School. She has a Masters in Nutrition from the American University of Beirut and the European Espen Diploma of Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. She is the Public Relation Chair of the American Overseas Dietetic Association and has a nutrition and health awareness TV show in Lebanon. Carla has participated in many international scientific meetings, been teaching in different universities in Lebanon and published health articles in the Middle East. She is an active member of many international nutrition associations around the world.

Abstract:

Mass media have a considerable potential effect on health behavior and should be considered as one of the tools that play an important role in communicating about food safety and health research and services to people, as well as in shaping public perceptions and decisions about health. Healthcare professionals may influence the public with credible, evidence-based and up-to-date information on a wide range of health issues either through campaigns promoting the use of specific procedures or through the coverage of health related issues, aiming to encourage the use of effective services and discourage those of unproved effectiveness. The impact of media advertising on adults, children and adolescents is well documented, as is concern about some aspects of the media\'s powerful influence on attitudes and behaviors towards healthy eating habits and lifestyles.
With an estimated two billion people using the Internet worldwide social media applications and the digital environment became the new way people access information. According to the European Food Information Council users of social networks are playing a fundamental role as disseminators of food safety risk and benefit information. So, for food professionals, being able to monitor online conversations could provide an insight into consumers\' perceptions of food issues, and insight in the development of effective communication strategies that provides a framework for developing and delivering messages aimed at changing nutrition and food safety practices. The guidance will continue to evolve over time, just as the field of social media itself is constantly evolving.

Speaker
Biography:

Andrés Ramírez Restrepo is a Colombian chemist. He received several awards for academic excellence at his undergraduate studies (from Universidad Industrial de Santander) which he focused on the fragrance of tuberose flowers from Antioquia. His magister studies included accreditation of analytical methods to monitor pesticide residues in different local commodities. Since 2011 he is subscribed as researcher of contamination at trace levels of environmental compartments in the research group Grupo Diagnóstico y Control de la Contaminación of the Universidad de Antioquia, one of the most important public universities in the country.

Abstract:

Nowadays Colombian legislation uses an adaptation of the Codex Alimentarius MRLs to regulate pesticide residues according to Resolution 2906 of 2007. This document states that annual revision of the MRLs is needed but this has not happened since its issuance due the lack of specific information of pesticide incidence in agricultural products. In this study 6 commodities were validated (SANCO/12571/2013 and NTC-ISO/IEC 17025) for multi-residue multi-class methods using QuEChERS sample preparation and GC-MS or UPLC-MS/MS for the analysis of regulated pesticides in goldenberries (Physalis peruviana), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), potatoes (Solanum tuberosum), sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum), tamarillos (Solanum betaceum) and tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum). These Latin American products are representative and widely produced in Antioquia (Colombia).
Sample preparation followed the UNE-EN 15662 method: 150 mg of MgSO4, 25 mg of primary secondary amines, 25 mg of octadecylsiloxane (goldenberries, potatoes, tamarillos and tomatoes) and 2.5 mg of graphitized carbon black (tomatoes). Goldenberry, potato, and tamarillo extracts were injected using a programmed temperature-vaporizing injector. Lettuce, sugarcane and tomato extracts were analyzed by UPLC-MS/MS. The residues were validated over a range from 0.01 to 0.10 mg/kg in potato (10 pesticides) and sugarcane (5 pesticides); from 0.02 to 0.20 mg/kg in goldenberry (28 pesticides), tamarillo (33 pesticides), and tomato (24 pesticides) and from 0.025 to 0.50 mg/kg in lettuce (15 pesticides). Validation included specificity (ions/transitions ratio), linearity (residuals ≤ 20%), bias (%RSD ≤ 20%), trueness (%R 70-120%), LOQ and uncertainty assessment (≤ 50%).
An initial risk assessment was enabled by monitoring 24 samples of each commodity (except sugarcane) in the municipalities of El Peñol, Marinilla and San Vicente Ferrer. Risks were found for goldenberries, potatoes and tomatoes, but it was only significant in tomatoes. The results obtained are expected to be useful in future improvement of the Resolution 2906 to establish suitable MRLs in Colombia.

Yasmina Sultanbawa

University of Queensland
Australia

Title: Innovative functional ingredients from plant sources in food applications

Time : 10:40-11:00

Speaker
Biography:

Yasmina Sultanbawa is a Senior Research Fellow at the Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation (QAAFI), University of Queensland. She has 18 years’ experience in value addition to food and has a track record of working with industry and attracting national and international funds where commercialization has been a key outcome. Yasmina has a Masters in Food Science from the University of Reading in the UK and a PhD in Food Chemistry from the University of British Columbia in Canada. Some of her current research work is based on the bioactivity of Australian native foods and their potential applications in the food and nutraceutical industries.

Abstract:

New food safety issues emerge for many reasons. It could be due to a microorganism evolving to become a pathogen or a pathogen becoming more virulent. The globalized food supply chain and food production methods are also seen as contributing factors. Other reasons are the change in eating habits of people and their desire to lead a healthy lifestyle. Consequently, there has been an increase in the consumption of fresh/ unprocessed/ additive free food. Food safety and quality and sustainability of production are some of the driving forces that are presently changing the market for fresh food. The challenges of addressing the safety issues have resulted in the development of innovative technologies to improve safety of fresh food. Among, these technologies, the most promising are those based on the search for affordable and environmentally friendly novel technologies. Natural preservation technologies using plant extracts are being increasingly explored to extend the shelf life of fresh food. Plant antimicrobials are phytochemicals which are important for the proper functioning of the plant and used as plant defense agents against microorganisms and other predators. Phenolic compounds are a rich source of antioxidants which can extend the freshness of the product by preventing oxidation. The Australian native food industry with its diverse and rich flora has a huge potential to contribute to the growing natural functional ingredient market. Case studies of natural antimicrobials in extending the storage life of meat, seafood and horticultural products will be discussed with successful commercial applications.

Break: Networking & Refreshment Break 11:00-11:[email protected] Room Coffee Station
Speaker
Biography:

Guo Boli has researched on food geographical origin and contamination traceability using the techniques such as stable isotopic fingerprint analysis, elemental fingerprint analysis, NIR and chemical compositions analysis. The technologies can be used for protecting the products with Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) and Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) in Europe, and Geographical Indications (GI) in China from fraud. Also they can be used to trace the contamination source and prevent the disease or hazards from spreading. More than 70 articles were published in Food Chemistry, Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry and other Journals, 4 books such as Technology of Beef Geographical Origin Traceability, Research of plant origin food contamination traceability, food safety introduction and food safety control in China were published.

Abstract:

Agricultural products reflect characteristics of their environment and physiology through organic or non-organic compounds in the organisms. The geographical information in each region not only includes the geologic feature, soil type, latitude and altitude, but also the meteorological factor, such as temperature, precipitation and air humidity, the latter can be uncertain factor along with inter-annual change. Other than geographical origin and cultured year, genotype and the interaction of genotype and environment might also influence the geographical traceability fingerprints in foodstuff, all the factors above might bring the complexity and uncertain factor to figure out the effective fingerprints. A three consecutive experiment with ten genotypes of wheat were grown in three different regions (Zhaoxian of Hebei province, Huixian of Henan province, and Yangling of Shaanxi province) of China during the 2010−2012 growing seasons, totally 270 wheat kernel samples were collected in harvest time. The stable isotopes (δ13C, δ15N and δD), multi-elemental compositions (Mg, Al, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, As, Sr, Mo, Cd, Ba, Pb) and near-infrared spectra (950nm - 1650nm) were analyzed in order to investigate the effects and contributions of wheat origin, genotype, harvest year and their interactions on fingerprints in wheat kernels. Combined with analysis of variances, all the fingerprints were significantly influenced by wheat origin, genotype, harvest year and their interactions, but δ13C, δ15N, δD, Mn, Sr, Mo, Cd, and wavelength ranges of 975–990 nm, 1005 nm, 1200 nm, 1300–1340 nm, 1355–1380 nm were found to be closely related to wheat origin, a robust discrimination model was established subsequently using the screened indicators. This could provide powerful theoretical basis for geographical traceability of wheat and other foodstuffs of botanical origin, even mixed with different genotypes and different years.

Ian Thomas

6 Pump Court
United Kingdom

Title: Understanding the food regulatory lifecycle

Time : 11:35-11:55

Speaker
Biography:

Ian Thomas was called to the Bar of England and Wales in 1993 and he is a barrister in the Chambers of Stephen Hockman QC, 6 Pump Court, Temple. London. He is also a qualified lawyer in the Republic of Ireland. Ian is a specialist regulatory lawyer practising in the law relating to food and beverages. He is instructed by clients from across the entire spectrum of the food sector including primary producers, abattoirs, manufacturers, suppliers, retailers and businesses in the hospitality sector, and also by the regulators. Ian has experience of a wide range of food law matters including, food safety and hygiene, food information and claims, borderline products, food supplements, traceability, withdrawals and recalls, animal welfare and cattle identification. A large part of Ian’s practice involves the interpretation and application of EU law. He advises on non-contentious compliance issues as well as contentious matters and appears in court in relation to general enforcement issues, challenging the actions of the regulators and appealing notices, and prosecuting and defending food law matters in the criminal courts. Ian is a regular speaker at food law and regulatory events and he is an experienced legal trainer. In addition to his food law work, Ian’s practice includes other regulatory law matters such as health and safety, trading standards and consumer protection, licensing and environmental. Ian is authorised by the Bar Standards Board to receive instructions directly from clients as part of the public access scheme. He is a member of the Society of Food Hygiene and Technology, the Food Law Group, the Institution of Occupational Safety and Health and the Health and Safety Lawyers’ Association.

Abstract:

Food is a necessity. Many consumers do not give much thought to how their food is made. Quite rightly they expect food they buy to be safe, wholesome and accurately described. In order to fulfil that expectation the production of food is heavily regulated at all stages from development to production and manufacture through to distribution and supply to consumers. Some consumers demand very specific information about their food and how it is made. This may be from an ethical perspective regarding the humane treatment of animals and the non-exploitation of food workers. Other consumers may have more personal requirements for example protecting against allergies, intolerances or other food related conditions or to fulfil lifestyle choices such as not eating meat and products of animal origin. This presentation will consider some of the key regulatory issues at EU and domestic levels which are aimed at providing all consumers with the information they require to make informed choices about their food. The presentation will follow the regulatory lifecycle from ‘farm to fork’ and will start by considering how animal welfare is protected and promoted. It will then look at traceability which is particularly important for providing accurate information to consumers and protecting the integrity of the food chain. There will then be a discussion regarding how regulation dictates what goes into our food and how it is made to ensure that it is safe and wholesome. The presentation will then look at some specific consumer-facing issues such as the provision of food information and the types of claims that can be made about food. Consideration will be given to measures designed to reduce food waste and strengthen the sustainability of the food system. Finally we will look at some issues around the enforcement of food law and how effective enforcement is essential to providing a level playing field for compliant businesses, deterring non-compliant businesses and promoting the integrity of the food chain amongst consumers.

Bárbara Teixeira

Portuguese Institute for the Sea and Atmosphere
Portugal

Title: Phosphate levels in seafood products in Portugal : Where to after two decades of quality control

Time : 11:55-12:15

Speaker
Biography:

Bárbara Teixeira is a marine biologist and has developed her PhD work in chemistry at the Portuguese Institute for the Sea and Atmosphere and at the University of Aveiro, Portugal. Her research interests include seafood technology, quality control, development of analytical methodologies, and upgrading and development of new seafood based products.

Abstract:

The consumption of phosphates, particularly added inorganic phosphates, may cause several health problems for the general population. Thus, it is important to know the levels of added phosphates in foodstuffs, namely in seafood. In this context, this work aimed to evaluate to what extent the legislated maximum phosphates value of 5 g P2O5/kg (1 g P2O5/kg in surimi), that can be added, has been followed in the last two decades in Portugal. For this purpose the organic baseline levels of phosphates were characterized in several species of crustaceans, molluscs and fish. For the evaluation of commercial samples data was gathered from the results of quality control samples analysed during two decades at the Portuguese Institute for the Sea and Atmosphere. The natural phosphates variations obtained allowed to define limits above which it can be said that phosphates were added, and to quantify them. Average phosphates contents varied between 3.5 and 6.5 g P2O5/kg in wild sea bream and chub mackerel, respectively. In the case of commercial samples fish fingers presented the lowest average values of total phosphates (1.3 g P2O5/kg), while salted and dry cod, hake and shrimp had contents higher that 10 g P2O5/kg in some of the products analysed. Despite these high values the majority of the analysed samples are within the allowed limits. Though commonly the content of organic phosphates has been estimated using the conversion factor of 10.6 mg P/g of protein the natural phosphates and protein variations determined in seafood showed that it is not adequate for all seafood products, and thus new conversion factors were proposed.

Speaker
Biography:

Gamal Enan has completed his Ph.D. in Microbiology. He is a Professor and Chairman of Research Group of Bacteriology, Faculty of Science, and Zagazig University, Egypt (2009- up till now) .He is member in European Society of Microbiology, Immunology and Infectious diseases, American Society of Industrial Microbiology. He supervised 10 Ph.D. and 15 M.Sc. Degrees. He is a Supervisor of anther 20 thesis.

Abstract:

One hundred and fifty Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) isolates were obtained from clinical samples, characterized and identified. Out of this collection, thirty isolates were found to be methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Only one strain (isolate No.P59) out of this subgroup exhibited reduced susceptibility to vancomycin, recoding 8 and 10 µg/mL MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) and MBC (minimum bactericidal concentration), respectively. This strain was concluded as vancomycin intermediate S. aureus (VISA) and designated VISA P59. This VISA P59 further identified by 16S r RNA sequence analysis and PCR analysis revealed that it contained methicillin resistant gene (mec A) in its genome but did not contain vancomycin resistant genes (van A and van B) .The basic subunits of glycinin isolated from soybean protein (GBS) inhibited vigorously VISA P59 as qualitatively visualized by agar well diffusion method. GBS antimicrobial activity against VISA was stable over a wide pH range and under different incubation temperatures. It could prevent the in vitro growth of VISA P59 at 37 ºC for 4 days and inhibited almost 99% of viable growth of VISA P59 in minced beef meat stored at 37 ºC for 14 days. No animal toxicity was observed with GBS.

Aimee Sheree A. Barrion

University of the Philippines
Philippines

Title: Microbiological quality of retailed green salads in Los baños, laguna, philippines

Time : 12:35:12:55

Speaker
Biography:

Aimee Sheree A Barrion is a licensed Nutritionist-Dietitian in the Philippines. She is an Associate Professor at the Institute of Human Nutrition and Food, College of Human Ecology, UP Los Baños(UPLB). She got her BS Nutrition, MS Applied Nutrition and PhD in Food Science degrees at UPLB. She has been teaching at the University for more than 15 years. Before her teaching stint, she used to work as a foodservice manager for two years at KFC South Manila branches.
Aside from teaching,Barrion has extended numerous works as resource person, trainer and evaluator in different local and national food and nutrition activities and projects. She is also an active member of several professional organizations in the field of nutrition and dietetics.
In terms of research, she has presented a number of papers and posters in different scientific fora. She has also accumulated a list of non-ISI and ISI publications. Her field of research interests lie on food and nutrition and food safety. Her future plans include developing a natural antimicrobial wash formula for cleaning food service utensils and equipment and also aid local government in ensuring and maintaining food safety among the various small and medium scale food service units.

Abstract:

Introduction:
Eating greens such as that of minimally processed and ready to eat green salads became a trend to address the health and wellness need of the population. Although highly in demand, reduced shelf-life and rapid deterioration of products were the observed major drawbacks of minimally processing. The mere process of peeling, cutting, slicing intensifies its vulnerability to many forms of contamination and nutrient loss. The proximate composition and microbiological quality of minimally processed packed fresh green salads sold in seven different retail stores in Barangay Batong Malake, Los Banos, Laguna were assessed to provide research based information on its nutritional composition and food safety quality.
Methods: Proximate composition, microbiological quality and presence of filth in the sampled salads were analyzed using AOAC, BAM and floatation methods, respectively.
Results: The % chemical composition of the samples in ranges consist of carbohydrates (3.07- 14.26), protein (0.95-11.79), fat (0.03-3.64), fiber (0.64-1.13) and moisture (73.27-92.77). Microbial analysis showed a mean total plate counts of 2.4 x 107and a broad range of 2.7 x 104 – 6.6 x 107 CFU/g. Most probable numbers (MPN) of >11,000/g coliforms were found in four (4) samples and Escherichia coli bacteria were detected in five (5) samples but no E.coli count exceeded 9.2 MPN/g. Insect fragments and fiber were both detected in two (2) samples. Based on the specifications by the Food and Drug Administrations of the Philippines, the level of contamination could pose potential health hazard and imminent spoilage.
Conclusion: Although green salads contain fiber and low calorie which is important for weight loss and maintenance, the present findings accentuated the need for more stringent implementation of food safety measures to protect the consumers from possible occurrence of food poisoning.

Elijah Ige Ohimain

Niger Delta University
Nigeria

Title: Methanol contamination in indigenous fermented alcoholic beverages

Time : 12:55-13:15

Speaker
Biography:

Elijah Ige Ohimain is an Associate Professor of Bioenergy, Agricultural and Environmental Microbiology and formerly the Head of Department of Biological Sciences, Niger Delta University, Wilberforce Island. He has a PhD degree in Environmental Microbiology from the University of Benin, Nigeria and Post graduate diploma in Sustainable Development from Staffordshire University, UK. His research is focused on bioenergy, veterinary and agricultural microbiology, environmental science and petroleum microbiology. He has authored over 150 publications. He is also an Editorial Board Member for over 10 journals and reviewer for over 100 journal titles.

Abstract:

Incidence of methanol contamination of traditionally fermented beverages is increasing globally. In 2009, 25 persons died in Indonesia after consuming fermented palm wine containing methanol. In June 2015, 27 persons died after consuming toxic alcohol in India. Between April and June 2015, 89 persons died in Nigeria following the consumption of alcohol beverage produced from palm wine. In the Nigerian case, the beverage was found to contain 16.3% methanol and the blood methanol concentration of victims was found to be 1500-2000 mg/l. While there were speculations that unscrupulous vendors might have deliberately spiked the beverages with methanol but it is more likely that the methanol might have been produced by contaminating microbes during fermentation. Methanol production in traditional fermented beverages can be linked to the activities of pectinase producing yeast, fungi and bacteria. This study assessed some traditional fermented beverages that are prone to methanol contamination. The study concluded by suggesting that contaminated alcoholic beverages be converted for fuel use rather than out rightly banning the age long traditional alcohol fermentation.

Break: Lunch Break 13:15-14:[email protected] Lunch
Speaker
Biography:

Thozama Mandindi is an Senior Lecturer and Director of School of Technology at Walter Sisulu University, Eastern Cape South Africa

Abstract:

Introduction
Among the unconventional crops widely distributed throughout the wild in South Africa are native species, while other wild vegetables were introduced and adopted by indigenous people in South Africa. These belong to the Solanaceae and Urticaceae family, Solanum nigrum L (S. nigrum) and urtica lobulata (U. lobulata) L. E. Mey species respectively. S. nigrum and U. lobulata are widely distributed in various areas in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa and are used as food by some of the rural communities. These are economically important as wild vegetables, medicinal plants and weeds. Studies on Agropastoral societies indicate that these plant resources play a significant role in nutrition, food security and income generation.
Methods and Statement of objectives
The foliar micro morphological studies carried out on the leaves and stems of S. Nigrum and U. lobulata were observed with the JEOL (JSM-6390LV) Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) for better understanding of structural details and inorganic mineral elements deposits on the plants for supply of micro-nutrients for the poor communities. The content quantity of some of these secondary metabolites was also determined in the study using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer.
Results
Both the abaxial and adaxial surfaces were characterized by anisocytic stomata which were more prevalent on the abaxial surface than the adaxial surface of S. nigrum. The leaves of the S.nigrum species have only one type of multicellular non-glandular trichomes (NGTs) that are short and cylindrical, tapering to a sharp point while all parts of the U. lobulata are densely covered with stinging hairs characterized by the presence of multicellular glandular and non-glandular trichomes (GTs and NGTs). Crystal deposits were also observed on the surfaces of the leaves near the stomata and on the stem. Characteristically, a very interesting aspect of the chemistry of urticaceae family is the production of phytonutrients and antinutritional secondary metabolites out of the secretary structure such as flavonoids, alkaloid, phenolic acids, saponnins, phytates and tannins. Results of SEM showed deposits of dihydrate crystals which when translated to energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) analysis the spectra indicated that Ca, Al, Fe, Na, Si, K and CaC2O4-calcium oxalate were the major constituents of the crystals analyzed.
Conclusion
The concentrations of the selected secondary metabolites in the two species were determined to be lower than the levels considered to be toxic. These results are evidence that wild edible plants can be considered safe to be utilized as vegetables and to alleviate micronutrient, particularly mineral deficiencies amongst the resource poor communities.

Speaker
Biography:

Magdy M. Saad is a Professor, Department of Food Safety & Contamination, National Research Centre, Egypt.

Abstract:

This work is an attempt to monitor the most recent hazards of phthalate(s) in bottled drinking water recently consumed in Egyptian markets. A simple and reliable method was applied to detect 6 phthalate congeners in bottled drinking water at trace concentrations up to 10 ng./ ml. The variables of 3 different brands, bottle size (1, 2 & 5 liters), storage time ( 0, 1, 3 & 6) were considered in the experimental design. Liquid/ liquid extraction using methylene chloride/ n-hexane (80:20 v/v) was adopted for isolation and clean-up. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was applied for separation and quantization. The linear range of the GC-MS calibration of 0.3- 1.5 ug./ ml., with a mean correlation coefficient of 0.98 + 0.007, the detection limit was < 0.1 ug./L. and the recovery percentage was 88%. Data showed that <90% of the inspected bottled water samples were phthalates-free. Qualitative data revealed that the contaminated samples contained only 2 out of 6 studied congeners, namely di-2 ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) and di-n octyl phthalate (DOP). While, quantitative data exhibited concentrations not exceed 8 ug./ liter of drinking water.