Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Conference on Food Safety and Regulatory Measures Birmingham, UK.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Arpad Ambrus

National Food Chain Safety Office
Hungary

Keynote: Use of the combined uncertainty of measurement result for testing compliance of food commodities with legal limits

Time : 10.05-10.30

OMICS International Food Safety-2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Arpad Ambrus photo
Biography:

Árpád Ambrus graduated as Chemical Engineer at the Technical University of Budapest. He has obtained the degree of candidate of science in 1980. He is the Member of organizations like, FAO/WHO. He took part in joint meeting on pesticide residues. He is a part of Sub-committee of Food Safety of Hungarian Academy of Science. He is elected as a Member of Editorial Board of the J Environmental Science and Health. He is the Chairman of Codex Committee on methods of analysis and sampling. He has published over 80 papers in peer-reviewed scientific journals and edited 2 books.

Abstract:

For measurement of chemical contaminants the major components of uncertainty are the Sampling (Sub-Sampling (SS), homogenization of sub-sampled material, Sample Processing (SP) and Analysis (A).
In case of trace organic contaminants the major contributor to the combined uncertainty is the sample amounts up to 70% and 80% of total variance of analysis of pesticide residues and mycotoxins, respectively. Nevertheless, it attracts very little attantion. For verifying compliance with maximum legal limits there are two distictly different situations. In case of pre-market control it has been certified that at least a specified proportion of the product in terms of the minimum size and mass of bulk/laboratory sample complies with the legal limit. Therefore, the combined uncertainty (CVR) has to be taken into account. Once a commodity is on the market the official decision on its compliance will be made based on the average concentration of the analyte in the sample taken according to the relevant standard procedure and the uncertainty of the result (CVL) excluding sampling. CVL is normally determined as part of the validation of the method. Determination of CVS requires special study applying for instacs range statistics, fully nested or staggered designes. We have carried out extensive experimental and computer modelling work to determine the characteristics of sampling distribution and magnitude of sampling uncertainty. The results are utilised to provide guidance for correctly perform control of food commodities for testing compliance with legal limits.

Keynote Forum

Simon Flanagan

Reading Scientific Services Ltd (RSSL)
UK

Keynote: Quantitative Allergen Risk Assessment

Time : 10:30-10:55

OMICS International Food Safety-2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Simon Flanagan photo
Biography:

Simon is a biochemist by training who more latterly specialised in immunology. He has spent the last 29 years working within the food industry in roles spanning various sectors and functions (R&D, Quality and Analytical). It was whilst working for a large European infant foods manufacturer that he first became involved in the analysis and management of food allergens in the factory.Simon currently works for Reading Scientific Services Ltd (a wholly owned subsidiary of Mondelēz International – formally Kraft Foods), where he heads up their Food Safety Consultancy Group. He is a specialist in food allergens and provides technical consultancy and training to numerous blue chip manufacturers and retailers. Simon is a Fellow of the Institute of Food Science & Technology and active member of a number of professional bodies and industry groups (FDF, Food & Drink Europe, ILSI Europe, EFSA, MoniQA etc). He has also published several papers on the analytical measurement of food allergens and allergen risk assessment and has recently edited a reference book for Woodhead Publishing on allergen management published in Oct 2014 (Handbook of Food Allergen Detection and Control)

Abstract:

Against a backdrop of allergen labelling regulations that differ widely around the world, the issue of allergen management continues to present a big challenge for food producers. There is still a lot of uncertainty in the industry about how best to manage allergens, as evidenced by the fact that allergen-related issues still account for approximately 50% of all recalls in the US & UK. Undeclared allergens are increasingly becoming an issue in other EU member states as seen in the dramatic increase in RASFF (Rapid Alert System for Foods and Feeds) notifications sent out in 2009/13.
In order to protect allergic consumers from exposure to undeclared allergens, many food manufacturers have implemented allergen control programmes founded on risk assessment (using HACCP principles) & utilising prerequisite programmes. As there is currently no internationally agreed regulatory guidance with respect to the management of allergen cross-contamination or acceptable population based safe levels, this has lead to an inconsistency in risk assessment, mitigation and management systems. The speaker will cover the evolution of allergen risk assessment from a pure ‘hazard’ to a risk based ‘approach’ and describe new methodology which utilises data from the latest scientific studies.

OMICS International Food Safety-2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Peter Naughton-Penn photo
Biography:

With a career in microbiology for many years, from starting out in clinical laboratories to working in industrial microbiology including Food, Pharmaceutical and Environmental. Peter’scommercial career spans from working with major media manufacturers and manufacturers of microbial identification systems to his current position as International Manager with Microbiologics specialising in quality control and biomaterials. Peter has considerable experience in working with many major companies worldwide assisting them with their microbiology QC and identification requirements

Abstract:

The talk will focus on the importance of traceability with respect to cultures used for quality control purposes, in particular how commercially available products can greatly assist the laboratory in fulfilling ISO requirements of CRM and meeting current accreditation regulatory requirements.
There will be clarification of what is meant by the term Certified Reference Materials with respect to QC Microorganisms and an understanding of what is CRM.
The discussion will centre on what is and what is definitely not CRM and correct procedures for the handling and use of CRM. Where and when should it be employed.
Current ISO 11133 requirements for the use of QC organisms will also be touched upon and correct procedures for the maintenance of QC microorganisms

Keynote Forum

Ian Thomas

6 Pump Court
London

Keynote: The regulatory affairs of food and food industries

Time : 11:35-12:00

OMICS International Food Safety-2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ian Thomas photo
Biography:

Ian Thomas was called to the Bar of England and Wales in 1993 and he is a barrister in the Chambers of Stephen Hockman QC, 6 Pump Court, Temple. London. He is also a qualified lawyer in the Republic of Ireland.Ian is a specialist regulatory lawyer practising in the law relating to food and beverages. He is instructed by clients from across the entire spectrum of the food sector including primary producers, abattoirs, manufacturers, suppliers, retailers and businesses in the hospitality sector, and also by the regulators.Ian has experience of a wide range of food law matters including, food safety and hygiene, food information and claims, borderline products, food supplements, traceability, withdrawals and recalls, animal welfare and cattle identification.A large part of Ian’s practice involves the interpretation and application of EU law. He advises on non-contentious compliance issues as well as contentious matters and appears in court in relation to general enforcement issues, challenging the actions of the regulators and appealing notices, and prosecuting and defending food law matters in the criminal courts.Ian is a regular speaker at food law and regulatory events and he is an experienced legal trainer.In addition to his food law work, Ian’s practice includes other regulatory law matters such as health and safety, trading standards and consumer protection, licensing and environmental.Ian is authorised by the Bar Standards Board to receive instructions directly from clients as part of the public access scheme. He is a member of the Society of Food Hygiene and Technology, the Food Law Group, the Institution of Occupational Safety and Health and the Health and Safety Lawyers’ Association.

Abstract:

Consumers have a right to expect that their food will be safe and wholesome. Food businesses have legal obligations to fulfil that expectation.
Those obligations are achieved through a combination of ‘carrot and stick’. Putting the law to one side, the carrot can be seem as complying with the moral duty to do the right thing combined with the commercial and financial benefits that come with selling a safe high quality product. The ‘stick’ is the threat of enforcement action that follows a failure to comply with the vast array of rules and regulations that govern the production, manufacture and sale of food.The presentation will then consider some of the key EU and domestic regulatory affairs issues affecting the food industry such as, how integrated regulation affects all stages of food production from the ‘farm to the fork’.
It will then assess the importance of food businesses understanding their legal obligations in connection with making and selling food and how they can protect themselves, their food, and their reputation. This includes the steps that are necessary to prevent the sale of unsafe food and knowing what they must do in the event that a problem occurs.The presentation will then look at the important issue of enforcement of food law and the various measures available to regulators to proactively assist food businesses and to reactively respond to non-compliance. We will then highlight some of the consequences for food businesses when enforcement action is taken.
Finally the presentation will consider the importance of all stakeholders playing their part to protect the integrity of the food chain and protect consumers from harm.

Keynote Forum

Paul Isherwood

SHS Group Drinks Division
United Kingdom

Keynote: Improving end-to-end transparency

Time : 12.00-12.30

OMICS International Food Safety-2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Paul Isherwood  photo
Biography:

Paul Isherwood is Head of Technical & Quality for The SHS Group Drinks Division, accountable for the WKD, Merrydown, Shloer & Bottlegreen brands. Previously he enjoyed various roles of increasing responsibility in R&D, Innovation and Operations with GSK (Lucozade & Ribena), Virgin Drinks, Cott Beverages and Coca-Cola & Schweppes Beverages.
Paul is an active member of the British Soft Drinks Association and lectures on their Manufacturing Soft Drinks course. He is also a regular presenter at external events, including the ENG Global Food Safety summit in Madrid in 2014 and the BRC Food Safety Europe conference in London in 2014.

Abstract:

• Establishing and enforcing “farm to fork” ownership and responsibilities.
• Ensuring visibility across the supply chain to increase consumer trust.
• Connecting and collaborating within a community, sharing values and goals
Traceability is an integral part of food law designed to protect the consumer from food safety risk, fraud and quality issues. It is enabled by systems and processes. Transparency goes beyond traceability in that it can only be achieved if everybody works together in an open and honest way. More recently, transparency is driven from the need to satisfy the customer rather than the traditional need to understand a product’s individual supply chain. It also helps to manage incidents more quickly and effectively, thereby sustaining brand integrity.

  • Workshop on " Food safety in the management of food sensitivities: Differentiating allergies from intolerances"

Session Introduction

Carla Vartanian

American Overseas Dietetic Association, Lebanon

Title: Food safety in the management of food sensitivities: Differentiating allergies from intolerances
Speaker
Biography:

Carla Vartanian is certified in Clinical Bioethics from Harvard Medical School. She has a Masters in Nutrition from the American University of Beirut and the European Espen Diploma of Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. She is the Public Relation Chair of the American Overseas Dietetic Association and has nutrition and health awareness TV show in Lebanon. Carla has participated in many international scientific meetings, been teaching in different universities in Lebanon and published health articles in the Middle East. She is an active member of many international nutrition associations around the world.

Abstract:

Adverse reactions to foods are considered an important public health problem as millions of people experience them worldwide every year. Food allergies are slightly more common in young children and in people who have a family history of them. They mostly develop early in life, and many are outgrown. Clinical manifestations of various degrees of severity related to ingestion of foods can arise, only some of which can be defined as allergic implying an immune mechanism, unlike food intolerances which do not have immune system response to the offending food and the problem remains at the level of the digestive system. Despite the risk of severe allergic reactions and even death, there is no current treatment. According to the latest Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Food Allergy and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in the United States, following effective food safety guidelines and strict elimination of the offending food allergen from the diet and avoidance of any contact with the food by ingestion, skin contact, inhalation, or injection remain to date, the only proven medication therapy against a food allergy.

Break: Lunch Break 13:15-14:[email protected] Room Lunch
  • Track 4: Food Preservation, Quality Standard and Food Management Systems
    Track 5: Food Labeling
    Track 6: Risk-Benefit
    Track 7: Environmental Protection Co-Management with Food Safety
Speaker

Chair

Simon Flanagan

Food Safety & Allergens Reading Scientific Services Ltd (RSSL), United Kingdom

Speaker

Co-Chair

Paul Isherwood

SHS Group Drinks Division, United Kingdom

Speaker
Biography:

Stan Kubow is an Associate Professor at Dietetics and Human Nutrition at McGill University. He has over 95 peer-reviewed research publications in clinical and human population studies, animal models and cell culture examining the impact of foods, nutrients and phytochemicals on a variety of disease outcomes. He is on the Editorial Board of Nutrition and Medicine, Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism, Journal of Lipids and 10 PhD and 29 MSc students have graduated under his supervision. His current research activity is to study the impact of nutritional interventions against the metabolic syndrome, gut and lung inflammatory diseases and environmental toxicants.

Abstract:

Ozone exposure linked with air pollution represents a significant contributor to cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality which is closely related to pro-inflammatory events. As dietary polyphenols are associated with anti-inflammatory effects, we tested the efficacy of a polyphenol rich potato extract (PRPE) supplement to affect lung inflammation in ozone-exposed male and female C57BL/6 mice. Male and female mice were fed ad libitum either a 100% PRPE [chlorogenic acid (200 mg/kg diet) and ferulic acid (6 mg/kg diet)] or 20% PRPE [chlorogenic acid (40 mg/kg diet) and ferulic acid (1.2 mg/kg diet)]. After 4 weeks of dietary adaptation, animals were exposed to 0.8 ppm ozone or air in a stainless steel chamber for 4 hour and euthanized 24 hours post exposure. Dietary supplementation with PRPE protected against ozone-induced pulmonary inflammation/injury in both sexes as demonstrated by decreased protein concentration (100% and 20% PRPE) and lowered alveolar macrophage cell and neutrophil cell counts (100% PRPE) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. To identify for possible bioactive components, colonic digesta obtained from digestion of PRPE in a human simulated gastrointestinal model underwent metabolism via CaCo-2/HepG2 co-culture which mimics human intestinal and hepatic first pass metabolism. 3-Phenylpropionic acid (PPA) which is a microbial-generated metabolite of chlorogenic acid was detectable by electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry after CaCo-2/HepG2 co-culture of PRPE digesta. At physiological concentrations PPA showed protective anti-inflammatory action against H2O2-induced inflammation in human Calu-3respiratory epithelial cells. Overall, these studies indicate PRPE exerts anti-inflammatory pulmonary protection against ozone exposure which may be partly mediated by PPA.

Nikolaos E. Mavroudis

Northumbria University at Newcastle
United Kingdom

Title: The impact of Spore aggregation on viable and total counts of Bacillus subtilis

Time : 14:20-14:40

Speaker
Biography:

Nikos Mavroudis is a Senior Lecturer and Programme Leader in Food Science and leads the laboratory of Food Engineering & Separation of Actives (FoESA) in the Dept. of Applied Sciences in Northumbria University at Newcastle. Previously Nikos was a Research Scientist and Project Leader for Unilever R&D for 9 years and has been responsible for developing the separation expertise within Unilever R&D Vlaardingen, the Netherlands. His research interests are focused on Food Security & Food Safety, particularly relevant is his interest on bacterial flow cytometry and surface decontamination. Nikos has published 10 research articles in peer review journals and 12 patents/patent filings and his work has attracted ca 325 citations excluding self-citations.

Abstract:

Introduction: Decontamination of surfaces is a vitally important process in industrial settings, however in order to assess the efficacy of an antimicrobial, it is imperative that an accurate bacterial enumeration method is in place to avoid over or under-estimating the remaining bacterial count. Aggregation can be common in biofilm forming organisms such as B. cereus, therefore Bacillus subtilis spores area good safe alternative to model pathogenic organism. In these communication spores of B. subtilis are exposed to different conditions and their total counts as well as viable counts are assessed by plating and flow cytometry (FCM).
Aims: To assess the perceived viable counts of spores across a range of different pH conditions and compare these with the total counts via FCM and to compare these results with spore counts with a non-ionic surfactant present to gain an insight into ‘true’ counts.
Methods: Spores were examined in LB broth and PBS (100 mM) at pH 1, 3 5 and 7. Flow cytometry (FCM) was implemented to measure viability, physiology and total counts of spores. Viability was also analysed by plating. Particle size distribution (PSD) was also carried out on spores with and without tween 20 and the levels of aggregation compared.
Results: Tween yielded significantly higher total counts in most cases. At pH-7 in LB, tween increased counts by 55%. This highlights the level of error in count one could expect from standard enumeration techniques. The PSD data clearly showed an increase in aggregation as the pH lowered. The presence of tween 20 broke apart these aggregates, leaving a much more homogenous single population.
Conclusions: The impact of spore aggregation on viable counts is an overlooked aspect possibly due to limitations in methodological analyses. As such, tools which provide total counts such as flow cytometry are extremely valuable in this line of research.

Shengkui Cheng

Chinese Academy of Sciences
China

Title: Food waste away-from-home in urban China: A field study based estimate

Time : 14:40-15:00

Speaker
Biography:

Shengkui Cheng is a Professor and Director of the Center for World Geography and Resources at the Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research (IGSNRR), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). He is also the president of China Society of Natural Resources, a board member of the International Urban Agriculture and Food Security Foundation (RUAF), and a board member of the Chinese Association of Agricultural Science Societies. He is Editor-in-Chief for Resources Science and deputy Editor-in-Chief for Journal of Natural Resources. His research activities involve mainly on agriculture ecology and sustainable resource use. In recent years, he initiated research on food waste and its environmental impacts in China. He is Principle Investigator of the Natural Sciences Foundation funded key project “Food waste in urban China: Patterns, environmental impacts, and sustainable consumption” (2013-2017). The preliminary findings have been published in the first Chinese Food Waste report, with support from Oxfam. He has close collaboration with researchers in the Europe on food waste and would like to initiate similar collaboration with US partners as well.

Abstract:

When China continues to urbanize and increase the income of their inhabitants, consumer food waste becomes increasing challenging in China. However, there is hitherto little information on the scale and impacts of food waste in China. In this presentation, we will summarize the preliminary results from a Natural Sciences Foundation of China funded project on away-from-home food waste in urban China.This 4-year project aims to investigate the food consumption and waste patterns based on large-scale surveys in Beijing and Lhasa and analyze their resource and environmental impacts, drivers behind and policy implications. Our first round surveys in Beijing and Lhasa in 2013 (including 187 restaurants, 3833 samples) show that the amount of catering food waste per capita in urban area was about 80 grams or about 13%of the ordered amount and thisis higher in Lhasa (120 g) than in Beijing (75g). The food waste comprises many different groups including cereals (25%), vegetables (41%), meats (13%), aquatic products (11%), poultry (7%) and others. The scale of food waste varies greatly depending on saving awareness, portion sizes, preferences, income and ages and so on. The total catering carbon footprint of food waste in Beijing is 1.9-2.1 Mt CO2-eq with meat and vegetables contributing the most (together over 87%). We targeted mainly for restaurant consumers in the survey but included also schools meals because we believe school students are in significant stages of physiological and psychological growth and their attitudes towards food waste should not be neglected. Our first round surveys in Beijing show that about 130 gram food/cap/meal is wasted in school which consists of staple foods (45%), vegetables (30%), meat (15%) and other categories like soup and oil (10%). For the next step, we will expand our surveys in more cities in China. Meanwhile, we will be involved in an EU Horizon 2020 project from 2015 on where we will collaborate with University of Southern Denmark for further analysis of our surveyed results.

Hector Eduardo Martínez-Flores

University Michoacana of Saint Nicolas Hidalgo
Mexico

Title: The use of ultrasound as an emerging technology to preserve fresh juice

Time : 15:00-15:20

Speaker
Biography:

Hector Eduardo Martinez-Flores completed his PhD at the age of 31 years (1997) in the CINVESTAV-IPN Institution, Mexico. He undertook postdoctoral studies in the Universidade Estadual of Campinas, Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil from 1997 to 2000. He was visiting professor at Washington State University from 2013 to 2014. He has published more than 37 papers in reputed scientific journals, and has been and is serving as reviewer of 18 JCR journals.

Abstract:

Vegetable and fruit juices are universally accepted, due to their taste and fresh aspect – added to which, they are a source both of nutrients and bioactive compounds. However, the shelf life of fresh juices is short owing to the high moisture and fermentable solids content. Some products, such as carrot juice, demonstrate limited acidity. These factors contribute to microbial growth, in which case, thermal treatment is usually applied to food as a control method. Nevertheless, said treatment can reduce nutrients and affect sensory attributes. Ultrasound is a recent technology, which could be efficient in the control microbial damage and the increase of food shelf-life. Low frequency, high-intensity ultrasound waves are highly efficient in preserving foods. Said waves are associated with cavitation phenomena – explaining generation and evolution of microbubbles in a liquid medium. The result being the continued formation of microbubbles, the size of which increases a thousand-fold during alternative pressure-cycles, and reach a critical imploding size. Implosion involves the release of all the accumulated energy provoking focal increase in temperature, in turn, dissipates causing physical and chemical changes in microbial cells. Ultrasound combined with heat or pressure enhances the disruption of those cells resulting in the inactivation and/or killing of microbial cells. Ultrasound has been tested in the preservation of fruit and vegetable juices, such as: carrot, grape, cranberry, apple, pineapple, orange, watermelon and strawberry. In conclusion, ultrasound is proving to be a promising new technology with reference to its use in the preservation of fruit and vegetable juice.

Speaker
Biography:

Elien De Boeck graduated as a Bioscience Engineer from Ghent University in 2013. Now she is working at the Department of Food safety and Food quality at Ghent University. She is an assistant teacher for the lectures Quality Management and Risk Analysis and started a PhD focusing on the human dimension of food safety, investigating the food safety culture in food companies.

Abstract:

Food safety climate was defined as employees’ (shared) perception of leadership, communication, commitment, resources and risk awareness concerning food safety and hygiene within their current work organization. The food safety climate, prevailing in a food producing organization, can influence human behavior and decision-making of food business operators and affect the final delivered food safety or quality. Apart from applied processing technology and implemented food safety management systems, human factor and its potential effect on microbiological results have been investigated in this work. A food safety climate questionnaire with twenty eight indicators was developed and validated. Four farm based and four affiliated butcheries were screened on their food safety climate, level of implemented food safety management system and via product and environmental microbiological sampling objective data on the microbiological output of the butcheries was collected. No significant difference was found between the food safety climate scores of the affiliated butcher shops and the farm butcheries. But a trend can be seen, as the food safety climate was generally scored higher by these central managed butcher shops than by the independent small scale farm butcheries. The study revealed that despite a less elaborated/fit-for-purpose FSMS, some butcheries are able to achieve a good microbiological output, if a good food safety climate is present in their organization.

Speaker
Biography:

Thomas Bohn is a Professor of Gene Ecology in Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway. His research interests are focused on the impact of modern biotechnologies, especially genetically modified organisms (GMOs) on experimental model systems and on real food-webs. He is particularly interested in risk assessment and effect studies of products of modern biotechnologies. We use multiple model systems from viruses and bacteria to Daphnia magna and rodents in the laboratory. One focus has been on the food quality and ecotoxicity of GM plants (e.g. Bt-maize and Roundup Ready soy) in a feeding model using the waterflea Daphnia magna, also in combination with chemical stressors (herbicides and other chemical pollutants).

Abstract:

Food and feed quality is crucial to human and animal health. Quality can be defined as nutritional sufficiency of minerals, vitamins and fats, etc. but it also includes the absence of toxins, whether man-made or from other sources. Surprisingly, almost no data exist in the peer-review literature on herbicide residues in herbicide tolerant genetically modified (GM) plants after close to 20 years on the market. In research recently published by our laboratory we collected soybean samples grown under three typical agricultural conditions: organic, GM, and conventional (but non-GM). The GM soybeans were resistant to the herbicide Roundup, whose active ingredient is glyphosate. We tested these samples for nutrients and elements as well as relevant pesticides including glyphosate and AMPA (its main breakdown product). All individual samples of GM-soy contained residues of both glyphosate and AMPA, on average 9.0 mg/kg. In contrast, no sample from the conventional or the organic soybeans showed residues of these chemicals. This demonstrates that Roundup Ready GM-soybeans sprayed during the growing season take up and accumulate glyphosate and AMPA. Further feeding studies in the model organism Daphnia magna indicate that these residues reduce the quality of the GM soy The case illustrates that the innovation of improved weed control, enabled by genetic engineering and herbicide tolerant plants, i.e. by spraying herbicides during the growing season, also include unwanted contamination of toxic chemicals from where it was meant to work – on weeds in the environment – to consumers around tables and in barns.

Break: Networking & Refreshment Break 16:00-16:[email protected] Room Coffee Station
Speaker
Biography:

With the research work in the fields of Food Safety, Alenka Hmelak Gorenjak works closely with the University of Maribor. With the topic of her PhD studies she participated in the study for the project "Study on the influence of food processing on nitrate levels in vegetables", which was co-funded by the EFSA. Her research and scientific activity has resulted in the publication of scientific articles and publications with scientific and professional contributions to the conference. She is also a reviewer of scientific journal articles.

Abstract:

Vegetables constitute the main source of nitrates for the human body; other food groups and drinking water represent less significant sources. In the literature, high nitrogen inputs are often associated with adverse effects, associated with its conversion to the more toxic nitrite. In the oral cavity and the gastrointestinal tract, five to twenty percent of ingested nitrate is affected by anaerobic bacteria that convert it to nitrite, which represents 80% of the total human exposure to nitrite. The sources of the highest intake of nitrate for the human body are leafy vegetables and potatoes. In winter time, due to the increased accumulation of nitrates in lettuce, the nitrate intake is significantly increased by eating lettuce. The possibilities of nitrate reduction represent traditional forms of consumption of seasonal vegetables, such as white cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. capitata). The high performance liquid chromatography was used to determine the nitrate content in raw white cabbage and the changes in nitrate content after the fermentation and cooking of the fermented white cabbage. The white cabbage was fermented according to the classical process in large vinegar factories. In our study, the nitrate content in the raw cabbage was 374 mg/kg of fresh matter (between 118 mg/kg and 695 mg/kg). During the fermentation of the cabbage, the nitrate content was not significantly changed. After cooking, the nitrate levels in the fermented cabbage have significantly decreased by 22 %. In the winter time, eating cabbage (fresh or fermented) significantly reduces the intake of nitrates in our organism. Preservation of traditional dietary habits can therefore have a positive impact on human health

Yashasvi Sanja Perera

Trainee in Asian Collaboration for Excellence in Non-communicable Disease (ASCEND) Research Network
Srilanka

Title: Does the language used in labeling of food matter?

Time : 16:55-17:15

Speaker
Biography:

Yashasvi Sanja Perera is a MBBS doctor passed out from the University of Colombo at the age of 28 years and currently is a post graduate trainee in critical care medicine.She has been an ASCEND (Asian Collaboration for Excellence in Non-communicable Disease (ASCEND) Research Network) trainee since 2012 and involved in predoctoral research training. She has published more than 12 papers in reputed journals and has continuing interest in non communicable diseases related research.

Abstract:

The Asia-Pacific region is facing an epidemic of Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) partly as result of changing food habits and sedentary life styles. Studies have shown that Sri Lankan consumers are receptive to labelling and are willing to pay for these items. However, there is a wide variation in the labelling of foods. This study investigated language use in labelling of commonly used foods. A questionnaire was used to study labels of 177 common food items from supermarkets in Colombo, Sri Lanka and its suburbs with regards to labelling the name, ingredients and nutrition information. Subsequently a list of 10 common words used in the sections on ingredients and nutrition information were compiled and given to 65 patients and carers admitted to hospital with NCDs. This group was selected because the disease requires changes in dietary habits.English only was used in labelling food products by 64 (36.4%) and all three languages used by 41 (23.4%). Ingredients were mentioned in 169 and English alone was used in 99(56%). Nutrition information was given in 163 and English alone was used by129 (73.2%). 33.8% inpatients and accompanying carers, were not able to read even a single English word in the list. Food labels in Sri Lanka provide scant information in native languages of Sinhala and Tamil. A majority of patients accessing a premier hospital in the capital were unable to read the common contents given in labels. Urgent steps are required to make it mandatory to have information in native language.

Haya Alayadi

The Universty of Sheffield
United Kingdom

Title: Food Safety Management System: What, Why and How?
Speaker
Biography:

Haya M AlAyadi, A 27 years old years Saudi. Has completed two major Masters in Health System and Quality Management and the second in Dental Public Health. Now a PhD candidate researching in Oral Health Related Quality of life Measures. She is an Academic in King Saud Universty, also Head of quality in the dental care department.

Abstract:

For any organization it is crucial to establish a quality management system. Thus, as part of quality management of food organization is international accreditation that would enable an organization to set up a management system to maintain. The ISO accreditation is one of the most important international accreditation that refers to, The International Organization for Standardization. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has constructed different types of standards that could be employed according to the aim of the organization. Regarding food industry the ISO-22000 or the Food Safety Management System (FSMS) was initiated. Its main goal is the provision of internationally recognized standard for food safety management system that could be applied in any organization in the food chain in order to ensure that food is safe at the time of consumption. This lecture aims to illustrate the rationality toward ISO-22000, implementation technique to any organization in the food chain and requirements.